Posts Tagged ‘jeremyjackson’

10 Amazing Light Painting Photographers You Should Start Following Right Now

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Light Painting goes as far back as Pablo Picasso, and since the true formation of the medium with pioneers such as Dean Chamberlain, Eric Staller and Vicki DaSilva, there has been a mass of people trying their hand at the world of light painting photography. The advent of the digital camera and the popularity of DSLRs has only made this number grow exponentially.

In this sudden growth and glut of people experimenting — and I include myself as part of that “glut” so please don’t be offended or discouraged — it can sometimes be difficult to find those truly special artists who are expanding the medium and taking it to the next level. Luckily, I’m here to help. Here are 10 amazing light painting artists you need to check out: Read more…

Awesome Single Exposure “Portal” Light Painting Picture

If you’ve ever played the video game Portal you’ll know how addicting it can be. Sort of like a first person puzzle, the game and its sequel require you to use a portal gun to create linked “portals” through space in order to get out of sticky situations. Well, photographer Jeremy Jackson had an interesting idea: why not recreate the world of Portal with a well-planned light painting exposure?

The result, which you can see above, was actually shot as a single exposure using a Canon T1i and a manual 14mm f/2.8 lens. It took 357 seconds and one mid picture aperture change to get both the portals and trees lit properly, but there’s no denying the photo does the job and, according to Jackson, was a blast to shoot.

(via DIYPhotography)


Image credits: 154/366 – The Portal is a Lie? by Jeremy Jackson and used with permission

Photo of Laser Pointer Through Rain Reveals Water Drop “Snowflakes”

On a rainy day recently, light painting photographer Jeremy Jackson was playing around with a green laser pointer when he discovered something interesting: all the out of focus raindrops in the photograph had a lined pattern in them — and each one was unique! These “water drop snowflakes” were found in all of the photos he took that day.

Anyone know what causes this phenomenon?

(via DIYPhotography)


Image credit: Photograph by Jeremy Jackson and used with permission