Posts Tagged ‘iss’

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Explains How to Take Pictures of Earth from Space

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has been serving as one of the International Space Station’s resident photographers. Every day he posts beautiful photographs showing what our planet looks like from orbit to his Twitter account, @cmdr_hadfield.

Today the Canadian Space Agency released the video above, in which Hadfield takes the time to explain how to best photograph Earth’s landscape from 400km (~250 miles) above the surface.
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Scientists May Do Quantum Entanglement Test with a 400mm Nikon Lens on the ISS

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Albert Einstein once described quantum entanglement as “spooky action at distance.” The basic idea behind it is that certain things (e.g. particles, molecules) can interact with each other instantly (or nearly instantly) regardless of how far apart they are. For example, pairs of photons can affect one another when separated by vast distances, with the effects occurring even faster than light could have traveled between the two points.
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A Glimpse at Where Camera Gear is Kept on the International Space Station

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If you’re a photography enthusiast and ever have the good fortune of finding yourself floating around on the International Space Station, here are two words you should know: service module. Formally called the “Zvezda Service Module,” it’s the component of the ISS that houses all of the station’s life support systems, and is where the astronauts gather if there is any kind of emergency. But here’s the main reason you’ll want to pay the module visit: the fancy camera equipment used by the astronauts is stored on the walls!
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Time-Lapse Shows What Earth Looks Like to Astronauts on the ISS

We shared this time-lapse by photographer Bruce W. Berry yesterday in a post about NASA astronaut photography from the International Space Station, but we’d like to share about it a little more about it since it’s something that definitely deserves its own post.
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Neat Visualizations of the 1 Million+ Pics Shot from Space by NASA Astronauts

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Since NASA’s first mission to the International Space Station back in 2000, astronauts on board the artificial satellite have snapped over 1.1 million photographs. What’s neat is that every one of those photographs is available to the general public through a giant online database.

Open source rocket scientist Nathan Bergey decided to use his coding skills to do a little digging through the image archive, and ended up creating some beautiful visualizations showing where the images were shot in relation to our planet.
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Paying Tribute to Astronaut Don Pettit and His Amazing Photography from the ISS

Like many of us, astrophotographer Christoph Malin is a big fan of astronaut and fellow photographer Don Pettit. We’ve featured Pettit’s photography several times before — we even shared his entire talk from Luminance 2012 here — but in the video above, Malin puts together a little bit of both into a fitting tribute to his favorite “astronaut, poet and astrophotographer.” Read more…

Canadian Astronaut Tweets Daily Photos From the International Space Station

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Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield is a bit of a space celebrity. Some of his hobbies include tweeting back and forth with William Shatner, posting recordings from space on SoundCloud, and even beaming down the occasional video of himself playing the guitar.

But the best of his messages from space (at least in our humble opinion) have got to be the photos of Earth he tweets daily from the ISS. Read more…

Astronauts on the ISS Use a ‘NightPod’ to Stabilize Their Low-Light Photos

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Astronaut photographers on the International Space Station have been beaming quite a few photographs of Earth as of late, but have you ever wondered how they manage capture relatively sharp photographs of Earth’s cities at night?

The speed at which the ISS hurtles around our planet is indeed a major challenge for low-light photography, and astronauts in the past have tried to overcome it by using high-speed film or by doing some manual tracking (which is very hit-and-miss). Luckily, space shooters nowadays have a new special tool up their sleeve: the NightPod.
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Photos Showing the Strange Similarities of Human Cities and Human Neurons

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In the side-by-side images above, the photo on the left shows a city as seen by astronauts on the International Space Station, and then photo on the right shows a photo of a neuron imaged with fluorescence microscopy. One is massive and seen from a grand scale, while the other is microscopic and cannot be seen by the human eye, yet they look strangely similar in their structure.

Infinity Imagined has a gallery of these comparisons of cities and neurons, showing the strange and striking similarities between the two.
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A Time-Lapse Message From the ISS to All of Humankind

Photographs captured by astronauts on the International Space Station are in the public domain, so they’re often remixed into gorgeous time-lapse videos. Italian filmmaker Giacomo Sardelli went a step beyond many of the ISS time-lapses we’ve seen by adding in more than just epic music: he included short audio messages recorded by the astronauts who worked in the space station.
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