Posts Tagged ‘iphoneography’

My Hospital Eye or: How I Started to Love iPhoneography

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Professional photographers using their smartphones is just a fad, I thought, but it all came to me sooner than I expected. Some 3 weeks ago I was diagnosed with central serous retinopathy in my left eye and was hospitalised for 3 days. In the process, I finally discovered smartphone photography!
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Dear Apple, Let’s Talk About Photos

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We’ve been managing our photos together for almost a decade now. Things were nice and simple at the start and we both knew what to expect from each other–I pulled my photos off my camera on the computer, imported them into iPhoto and arranged them. Life was good.
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New Apple Commercial Touts the iPhone as the World’s Most Popular Camera

Here’s a new iPhone commercial Apple just released today on its website and on YouTube. It’s a 1-minute-long spot that focuses on how the iPhone has shaken up the world of casual photography by becoming the world’s most popular camera.
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Traveling Photographer Shoots the Great American West Using Only His iPhone

Getting noticed for quality landscape and wildlife photography is difficult enough, but try doing it on an iPhone. That’s what photographer Kevin Russ has been doing, traveling the great American West and capturing stunning photos using nothing more than an iPhone 4S and 5. Read more…

Instagram Photo Chosen as Winner of UK Contest From Among 5,700 Entries

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We can no longer ignore smartphones as legitimate photography gear. As smartphone cameras have gotten better we’ve seen everything from hipstamatic war photography to iPhone fashion shoots, and here comes yet another first.

Of 5,700 entries, Laura Elliot of County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland won first place at a recent National Trust photography competition with her photo taken using only an iPhone 4 and (what else?) Instagram. Read more…

Will.i.am to Launch iPhone Add-On That Boosts Resolution to 14MP

Want larger photos from your iPhone? Black Eyed Peas frontman Will.i.am has a solution for you. The entrepreneurial musician will reportedly be launching a new iPhone attachment next week that will “turn your smartphone into a genius-phone” and boost the phone’s camera resolution from 8 megapixels to 14 megapixels. Like the man who developed it, the device will have a quirky name: i.am+.
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Instagram Photograph of Hurricane Sandy Selected for Cover of Time Magazine

Yesterday we shared a piece by photographer Kenneth Jarecke on why Instagram isn’t fit for photojournalism. Now, from the other side of the aisle, Jeff Bercovici of Forbes writes that Time had great success after hiring five Instagrammers to document Hurricane Sandy:

The resulting collection on Lightbox, Time’s photography blog, was “one of the most popular galleries we’ve ever done,” says [Time DP Kira] Pollack, and it was responsible for 13% of all the site’s traffic during a week when Time.com had its fourth-biggest day ever. Time’s Instagram account attracted 12,000 new followers during a 48-hour period.

One of Benjamin Lowy’s photos even ended up getting selected for the cover, although it’s one of three covers Time is running this week […] While the level of resolution isn’t perhaps what might be achieved with a camera, says Pollack, “It reproduced beautifully. There’s almost a painterly quality to it.”

Pollack tells FolioMag that the decision to use Instagram was based on distribution speed rather than aesthetics.

Why Time Magazine Used Instagram To Cover Hurricane Sandy [Forbes]


P.S. It seems that by “Instagram photo”, Forbes and Time are referring to the fact that they were shared through, not captured with, Instagram.

“As for You Instagramers, Twenty Years from Now You’ll Be Sorry”

Photojournalist Kenneth Jarecke wrote up a thought-provoking piece yesterday titled, “Instagram, the Devil, and You.” He offers his thoughts on the question, “Will ‘Instagram photojournalism’ stand the test of time?”:

As for you Instagramers, twenty years from now you’ll be sorry. You’ll be more sorry than I am when I look back on a picture I made twenty years ago with a 20mm lens when I should have used a 28mm. Years from now, you’ll awake in the middle of the night and suddenly realize putting a fake border on a picture makes the whole picture fake. You’ll understand that the technical choices you made destroyed the longterm credibility of both you and your images.

Instead of having a body of work to look back on, you’ll have a sad little collection of noisy digital files that were disposable when you made them, instantly forgotten by your followers (after they gave you a thumbs up), and now totally worthless. You’ll wish you’d have made those images on a Pentax K1000 and Tri-X (at the very least or most depending on your age and perspective), but the times you failed to record properly will be long gone. But don’t listen to me, listen to all your Insta-friends. They love you.

Instagram, the Devil, and You [Mostly True via The Click]


Image credit: Part of an art project involving tiny pics of my art — using #instagram as one part of the medium. by kimboburly

Remember That Hipstamatic Wedding Pic Craigslist Ad? Here Are the Photos

Photography purists, you might want to look away. For the rest of you: remember that Craiglist listing we shared a couple of months ago posted by a couple looking for Hipstamatic wedding photographers? Among the hoards of enthusiastic Hipstamatic shooters who responded were Keith and Marc, hosts of the iPhoneography podcast TinyShutter. After being chosen for the gig, they drove down to Connecticut from Massachusetts and New Hampshire to capture the wedding with their iPhones.
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Why Photographers Should Embrace, Not Scorn, Tools Like Instagram

It’s seems like many photo enthusiasts are hating on Instagram and retro-filtered photos these days, but not photographer Richard Koci Hernandez. He has written a piece for CNN titled “Photographers, embrace Instagram,” in which he explains why he thinks that “Smartphones have ushered in a golden age for photography.”
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