Posts Tagged ‘introduction’

A Brief Intro to Shooting with a Rangefinder Camera

If you’ve never picked up a rangefinder camera before and have always wondered how it differs from single-lens reflex cameras, here’s a short video that may be of interest to you. In it, photographer Craig Semetko discusses the basics of rangefinder photography — in this case he’s using a Leica M — and its advantages compared to SLRs.

(H/T Leica Rumors)

The Photographer’s Introduction to Color, from Color Space to Monitor Calibration

colorheader

If you’re a photographer today, you’re probably sharing your photos everywhere from Facebook to Flickr. Your photos are being seen on every device possible: iPhones, Samsung Galaxys, crappy Dell office monitors, and Mac Retina Displays. Each online service, each device, even each web browser handles color differently. If you’re putting your photos up online, you really need to think about how you output files for the web. If you accidentally save to the wrong color space, you can really change people’s perception of your photos.
Read more…

Quick and Informative Intro to SLR Lenses for Beginners

The world of camera lenses can be a bit daunting when you first start out, and so a videographer and photographer have joined forces to put together a fun (and funny) introduction to all the basic lens options, what they do, and what situations you might use them in. Read more…

So You Want to Shoot Film?

8241720675_c37aa6681c_z-1

I have been shooting a lot of film lately and enjoy it tremendously, so I thought I’d share some of the experiences I’ve had in the last year or so, mainly so you can learn from the mistakes I made, avoid them and then make your own.

For the sake of getting some kind of structure into this post I’ll try and describe three typical scenarios of people shooting film today, differentiated by the amount of control you’ll have over the image.
Read more…

An Introduction to Playing with Ultraviolet Fluorescence in Photographs

flouro(pp_w860_h572) copy

Ultraviolet fluorescence is a mechanism in which UV radiation excites chemicals in an object and causes them to release visible light. There are many household objects which fluoresce, such as some washing detergents (anything that ‘makes your whites whiter), soda water (it contains a chemical called quinine which makes it taste bitter, and also causes the fluorescence), the dyes found in highlighters, the bacteria found on the face (which cause spots and acne), bodily fluids (including urine) and much more.
Read more…

Canon Introduces a Virtual DSLR Website to Help Beginners Learn the Basics

outsideofauto

If you’re just starting out in photography, there are a lot of resources out there to help you understand the basics before you just jump in. And while books and videos are certainly helpful, one of the more fun ways to learn your way around a camera is by using an online DSLR simulator. We’ve shared one with you before, and now Canon Canada has released a simulator website of its own dubbed Outside of Auto. Read more…

An Introduction to Aspect Ratios and Compositional Theory

compositionaltheory-7

Here’s a primer for beginning photographers on the concepts of aspect ratios and compositional theories.
Read more…

The Simplified Guide to Getting Started in Photoshop

When photographer Devon Mikale was in high school, he created this lengthy manual for his newspaper class to help others learn how to get started in Photoshop. The high school’s faculty loved it so much that they ended up purchasing it for re-distribution in future classes. Mikale has graciously allowed us to publish the guide here for free.

It’s a lot of images and information, but if you’re just starting out and have been overwhelmed by all the different things you need to learn, this guide will walk you through the fundamentals.
Read more…

A Beginner’s Tutorial on Using Photoshop Layers, Sesame Street-style

Here’s a humorous and lighthearted 5-minute video titled, “Fafa’s Photoshop Tutorial.” Created by the comedy series Glove and Boots, it’s a short and sweet introduction to using layers in Photoshop… taught by puppets. Think Sesame Street meets Scott Kelby.
Read more…

A Great Graphic for Understanding How ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed Work

Check out this awesome exposure triangle graphic found in this Exposure Guide tutorial on the fundamentals of exposure:

When these three elements are combined, they represent a given exposure value (EV) for a given setting. Any change in any one of the three elements will have a measurable and specific impact on how the remaining two elements react to expose the film frame or image sensor and how the image ultimately looks. For example, if you increase the f-stop, you decrease the size of the lens’ diaphragm thus reducing the amount of light hitting the image sensor, but also increasing the DOF (depth of field) in the final image. Reducing the shutter speed affects how motion is captured, in that this can cause the background or subject to become blurry. However, reducing shutter speed (keeping the shutter open longer) also increases the amount of light hitting the image sensor, so everything is brighter. Increasing the ISO, allows for shooting in lower light situations, but you increase the amount of digital noise inherent in the photo. It is impossible to make an independent change in one of the elements and not obtain an opposite effect in how the other elements affect the image, and ultimately change the EV.

If you’re just starting out in photography, do yourself a favor and work through the Photography Basics page over on Exposure Guide. It’s a fantastic resource.

Exposure – ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained [Exposure Guide via Reddit]