Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Hear What It’s Like to Serve as an Official White House Photographer

As a followup to our post earlier today about former White House photographer Eric Draper’s work, here’s an interesting and relevant 17-minute-long story that aired on NPR in January of this year. It’s an interview with former presidential photographers Eric Draper and Robert McNeely, who photographed the presidencies of George W. Bush and Bill Clinton (respectively).
Read more…

Antonin Kratochvil Discusses His Love of Simple, Intimate Photography

Over the course of his career, Antonin Kratochvil has made a name for himself as one of the great photojournalists of our time. He’s photographed everything from Mongolian Street Children to war zones, to Bono, and through it all has managed to maintain an intimacy in his style and simplicity in his approach that is both inspirational and refreshing. Read more…

Interview with Photographer Joey L.

Joey Lawrence, better known by his professional name, “Joey L.,” is a Canadian commercial photographer, director and published author based in Brooklyn, New York. Visit his website here.


joeyl

PetaPixel: Can you tell us about yourself and how you got started in photography?

Joey L: When I was 16 years old and in high school, all my friends were in bands. I could never sing (I’m beyond horrible) or play any instruments, so instead I became the photographer. I would help them build press kits and band profiles for their websites, experimenting along the way and learning everything I could about the technical side of photography.
Read more…

The Sartorialist Sits Down with Legendary Photographer Steve McCurry

Scott Schuman, known better as fashion photographer “The Sartorialist,” is currently four of five parts through a fascinating interview with legendary Magnum photographer Steve McCurry. We’ll add the fifth video as soon as it goes up, but for now, each of these short 2-4 minute talks offers plenty of wisdom to get you through the day (or week… or maybe month). Read more…

Haunting Long-Exposure Photography of WWII-Era Bunkers

To fill the time during slow winter months, photographer Jonathan Andrew decided to follow through on an idea that he had a few years back: he started photographing old WWII bunkers. Based out of Amsterdam, he already had several to work with close-by, but as the project has received more and more media attention, he’s taken the time to travel all over Europe, adding more beautiful, haunting bunker images to his portfolio. Read more…

“If It Might Change Man’s Mind Against War… It Would Be Worth My Life”

eugenesmithwar

The New York Times has published a recently-discovered interview photographer W. Eugene Smith gave the American Society of Media Photographers back in 1956. Here’s Smith’s response to the question, “When do you feel that the photographer is justified in risking his life to take a picture?”:

I can’t answer that. It depends on the purpose. Reason, belief and purpose are the only determining factors. The subject is not a fair measure.

I think the photographer should have some reason or purpose. I would hate to risk my life to take another bloody picture for the Daily News, but if it might change man’s mind against war, then I feel that it would be worth my life. But I would never advise anybody else to make this decision. It would have to be their own decision. For example, when I was on the carrier, I didn’t want to fly on Christmas Day because I didn’t want to color all the other Chistmases for my children.

He also shares thoughts on the issues of staging and retouching. It’s a fascinating read. Check out the full interview through the link below.

W. Eugene Smith: ‘I Didn’t Write the Rules, Why Should I Follow Them?’ [NYTimes]

Snap Snap Snap: A Look Into the Mind of a Military Photojournalist

What’s it like to shoot on the front lines of battle as a military photojournalist? This 15-minute documentary by filmmaker Hannah Hill will tell you. Here’s the video’s description:

This is a documentary about Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane, a United States Air Force photojournalist, who has deployed to Afghanistan twice. He shares his experiences as a photojournalist in a combat environment as well as the mental and physical toll it takes on him.

Crane is based out of O’Fallon, Illinois, and has served as a combat cameraman for a Special Forces, photographing the war with a DSLR and an M4.
Read more…

Interview with Billy Rowlinson: Youngest Photographer at the London Olympics

Billy Rowlinson is a photographer based in London. He was an official photographer at the London 2012 Olympics this past summer at the age of 18. Visit his website here.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Billy Rowlinson: I’m Billy Rowlinson, I was born and currently live in London, United Kingdom. I turned 19 in October and I’m currently on a gap year before hopefully going to study Film Production at university.
Read more…

Photographer Behind Infamous Subway Photo Gives Interview on Today Show

The New York Post got the whole world talking about it yesterday after publishing a morbid front page photo showing a man about to be struck by a subway train. The photographer behind the image, freelance photojournalist R. Umar Abbasi, has received criticism from people who believe he should have done more to help the victim, or, at the very least, do anything but snap photographs of what was about to happen.

Abbasi appeared on the Today Show this morning to give an exclusive nationally-broadcast interview to explain his actions and to tell the story of what happened from his perspective.
Read more…

‘Double Exposure': A Portrait of Identical Twin Photojournalists, the Turnley Bros

Even if you’ve never heard of Peter and David Turnley, you’ve likely seen at least one of their photographs at some point in your life. The identical twins are two of the most renowned photojournalists to have covered world events over the past few decades. The video above is a fascinating 13-minute-long feature titled “Double Exposure,” which aired on 60 Minutes back in 1996 (warning: there are some strong images of violence).
Read more…