Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Words of Wisdom by Renowned Portrait Photographer Gregory Heisler

Legendary American portrait photographer Gregory Heisler was recently invited to give a talk to the American Society of Media Photographers in Oregon. Prior to the lecture, Stumptown Visuals caught up with him to ask him for some words of wisdom. What resulted was this 8-minute gem that contains a good deal of advice you can apply to your own portraiture.
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An Interview with American Photographer Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson is an American photographer who’s well known for his photographs of Harlem, New York City decades ago. In the video above, he sits down and talks to Leica about his life and work:

Renowned photojournalist and Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson has been acclaimed for over half a century for his searing images of street gangs, circus performers and the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, all captured with a remarkable directness, truth and power that transcends the concept of style. Here, in his own words, are Bruce Davidson’s forthcoming, charming, and revealing insights into who he is, what he’s done, and where he’s going.

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Photojournalist Julian Cardona on Documenting the Evolution of Juarez

Mexican photojournalist Julian Cardona has lived in Ciudad Juarez since 1960 and began documenting the city in the early 1990s as a photojournalist for the local newspaper, El Diario. He says he’s seen Juarez shift from an idyllic postcard-worthy border town to the city known as the homicide capital of the world.
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Thoughts, Advice, and Inspiration by Photojournalist Steve McCurry

Today’s dose of inspiration comes in the form of two videos for the price of one. Both videos feature well-known and well-respected photographer and photojournalist Steve McCurry — the man behind the unforgettable Afghan Girl photo that graced the cover of NatGeo — but each offer a different sort of insight into his world. Read more…

Interview with Javier Manzano

Editor’s note: This post contains graphic photos that some readers may find disturbing.


Javier Manzano is a freelance photographer currently based in Afghanistan — no stranger to documenting conflict. He received a 2011 World Press Photo award for an image from his 2010 work in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. The border city has been embroiled in a drug war since 2008 when the Sinaloa cartel moved to take over Juárez — located just over three miles from El Paso, Texas. Violence broke out between warring cartels, gangs and police. In 2010, Juarez recorded over 3000 homicides.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Javier Manzano: I was born and raised in Mexico and moved to the United States at the age of eighteen. Soon after graduating from college I landed a job at an advertising agency where I worked in for several years. The events that unraveled early on the morning of September 11, 2001 would change our lives forever. For me, it meant quitting my job and returning to school for what I believed was my calling in life – journalism. After completing several newspaper photography internships y became employed at the Rocky Mountain News in Denver, CO. The paper folded in 2009 and over 200 people were laid off. Since then, I’ve worked as a freelance photographer producing a wide range of material, from editorial and commercial photography, to news and documentary films.
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Unscrambling The Egg: The Leica M9 Monochrom

When Leica announced “Henri”, the M9 Monocrom on May 10th, it caused a lot of fervor on blogs and photography websites. The all black camera, named after the legendary black and white Leica photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson was devoid of almost all Leica markings and seemed niche even for the niche camera maker.
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National Geographic’s Senior Photo Editor On “What Photo Buyers Want”

A little over a month ago we featured an extended interview with long-time Newsweek Photo Editor Jamie Wellford. It was a longer video than we usually put up but very educational and well worth an hour of your time. And now Photoshelter has put together another long interview/webinar as part of their “What Photo Buyers Want” series, this one with National Geographic Senior Photo Editor Elizabeth Krist.

In the video, Photoshelter’s Allen Murabayashi goes in depth with Krist about the her background, NatGeo as a whole, and how the magazine goes about selecting from the many thousands of photo submissions they receive on a daily basis. If you’re into National Geographic photography and hope to maybe make a career of it some day, this is an hour of insight you won’t wanna miss.

What Photo Buyers Want: National Geographic’s Senior Photo Editor Elizabeth Krist (via The Click)

Moby on Photographing LA Architecture

In addition to being an internationally successful musician, Moby is also an avid photographer. He began shooting photos at the age of 10, and has since held numerous exhibitions around the world and published a photo book titled “Destroyed” (a title it shares with an album released at the same time). In the video above, Moby talks about his passion for shooting architectural photographs in Los Angeles, and also the photoblog he maintains through which he shares his work.

(via Doobybrain)

The Making of an Epic Solar Eclipse Photo

Of the photographs that emerged after the recent solar eclipse on May 20th, there aren’t many that are more epic than the “Ring of Fire” photo captured by Michael Chow of The Arizona Republic. In an interview with Dallas News, Chow reveals that the photograph was birthed rather spontaneously. Shooting the eclipse in Phoenix’s Papago Park — a hiking area he knows well — Chow noticed a group of people standing on a butte a quarter mile away. He parked his car, ran across some desert, and snapped the photograph using a Canon 1D Mark IV and 400mm lens at 1/6400 — all while doing his best to avoid looking at the sun directly.

Behind the Ring of Fire (via Coudal)


Image credit: Photograph by Michael Chow and used with permission

One Plus One Equals Three: Ken Burns on a Story Worth Telling

Ken Burns is a documentary legend, and even though he comes from a filmmaking perspective, his ideas on what makes a story worth telling (or, in our case, a moment worth capturing) are universal and universally inspiring. In this short interview he did with Redglass Pictures he talks about finding subjects where one plus one equals three — where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. He also talks about sincere emotional manipulation, and how he believes it is at the heart of his greatest documentaries. “Emotional truth,” maintains Burns, must be pieced together and created.

And it’s these abilities: the ability to create something that is greater than the sum of its parts, and the ability to “manipulate” the story to piece together an emotional truth that may not be obvious to the casual onlooker; its these abilities that should be at the center of every artist’s tool chest, be they photographer or documentary filmmaker.

Ken Burns On Story (via Fstoppers)