Posts Tagged ‘interview’

The Sartorialist Sits Down with Legendary Photographer Steve McCurry

Scott Schuman, known better as fashion photographer “The Sartorialist,” is currently four of five parts through a fascinating interview with legendary Magnum photographer Steve McCurry. We’ll add the fifth video as soon as it goes up, but for now, each of these short 2-4 minute talks offers plenty of wisdom to get you through the day (or week… or maybe month). Read more…

Haunting Long-Exposure Photography of WWII-Era Bunkers

To fill the time during slow winter months, photographer Jonathan Andrew decided to follow through on an idea that he had a few years back: he started photographing old WWII bunkers. Based out of Amsterdam, he already had several to work with close-by, but as the project has received more and more media attention, he’s taken the time to travel all over Europe, adding more beautiful, haunting bunker images to his portfolio. Read more…

“If It Might Change Man’s Mind Against War… It Would Be Worth My Life”

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The New York Times has published a recently-discovered interview photographer W. Eugene Smith gave the American Society of Media Photographers back in 1956. Here’s Smith’s response to the question, “When do you feel that the photographer is justified in risking his life to take a picture?”:

I can’t answer that. It depends on the purpose. Reason, belief and purpose are the only determining factors. The subject is not a fair measure.

I think the photographer should have some reason or purpose. I would hate to risk my life to take another bloody picture for the Daily News, but if it might change man’s mind against war, then I feel that it would be worth my life. But I would never advise anybody else to make this decision. It would have to be their own decision. For example, when I was on the carrier, I didn’t want to fly on Christmas Day because I didn’t want to color all the other Chistmases for my children.

He also shares thoughts on the issues of staging and retouching. It’s a fascinating read. Check out the full interview through the link below.

W. Eugene Smith: ‘I Didn’t Write the Rules, Why Should I Follow Them?’ [NYTimes]

Snap Snap Snap: A Look Into the Mind of a Military Photojournalist

What’s it like to shoot on the front lines of battle as a military photojournalist? This 15-minute documentary by filmmaker Hannah Hill will tell you. Here’s the video’s description:

This is a documentary about Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane, a United States Air Force photojournalist, who has deployed to Afghanistan twice. He shares his experiences as a photojournalist in a combat environment as well as the mental and physical toll it takes on him.

Crane is based out of O’Fallon, Illinois, and has served as a combat cameraman for a Special Forces, photographing the war with a DSLR and an M4.
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Interview with Billy Rowlinson: Youngest Photographer at the London Olympics

Billy Rowlinson is a photographer based in London. He was an official photographer at the London 2012 Olympics this past summer at the age of 18. Visit his website here.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Billy Rowlinson: I’m Billy Rowlinson, I was born and currently live in London, United Kingdom. I turned 19 in October and I’m currently on a gap year before hopefully going to study Film Production at university.
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Photographer Behind Infamous Subway Photo Gives Interview on Today Show

The New York Post got the whole world talking about it yesterday after publishing a morbid front page photo showing a man about to be struck by a subway train. The photographer behind the image, freelance photojournalist R. Umar Abbasi, has received criticism from people who believe he should have done more to help the victim, or, at the very least, do anything but snap photographs of what was about to happen.

Abbasi appeared on the Today Show this morning to give an exclusive nationally-broadcast interview to explain his actions and to tell the story of what happened from his perspective.
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‘Double Exposure': A Portrait of Identical Twin Photojournalists, the Turnley Bros

Even if you’ve never heard of Peter and David Turnley, you’ve likely seen at least one of their photographs at some point in your life. The identical twins are two of the most renowned photojournalists to have covered world events over the past few decades. The video above is a fascinating 13-minute-long feature titled “Double Exposure,” which aired on 60 Minutes back in 1996 (warning: there are some strong images of violence).
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Interview with Action-Sport Photographer Tim Kemple

Tim Kemple is an action-sport and lifestyle photographer based out of Salt Lake City, Utah. Visit his website here.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Tim Kemple: Sure. I’m a photographer and film maker based in Utah. I grew up on the East Coast and spent my weekends as a kid climbing, skiing and wandering. I started carrying a camera to document my adventures.
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Joel Meyerowitz Says He Despises Bruce Gilden’s Attitude, Calls Him a Bully

Sean O’Hagan over at The Observer has published an interesting profile of famed NYC street photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who had some pretty harsh things to say about his fellow NYC street shooter, Bruce Gilden:

I ask Meyerowitz about the combative, confrontational style of street photography espoused by the likes of fellow New Yorker Bruce Gilden, and he grows visibly angry for the only time in our conversation. “He’s a f**king bully. I despise the work, I despise the attitude, he’s an aggressive bully and all the pictures look alike because he only has one idea – ‘I’m gonna embarrass you, I’m going to humiliate you.’ I’m sorry, but no.”

Meyerowitz says that his street photography style is based on his boxer father’s advice to “pay attention” and anticipate the actions of the people he photographed. So here’s the difference between these two famous street photographers: one anticipates, and the other instigates.

Joel Meyerowitz: ‘brilliant mistakes … amazing accidents’ [The Observer]


P.S. Last month we wrote on how Gilden’s street photography attitude carries over into his teaching persona as well.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Phil!


Image credit: Joel Meyerowitz portrait 11/03/2012 reception by Jill Gewirtz

Interview with Rock & Roll Photographer Oliver Monroe

Oliver Monroe is a Los Angeles-based photographer who has photographed some of the world’s most famous bands and music artists in concert. Visit his website here.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Oliver Monroe: I grew up in the Washington, D.C. area, where my dad worked for the Department of Defense. In 1979, I moved to Los Angeles to further my career as a photographer. After nearly 10 years in the music/entertainment business, I hung up my camera bag and became a commercial film editor for the next 5 years. Wanting to see daylight again, I left editing and started a multimedia development company. I currently own a video encoding company, which caters to the entertainment industry.
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