Posts Tagged ‘interface’

The ‘Palette’ Customizable Control Interface Takes Your Post Workflow to the Next Level

palette2

When engineers Calvin and Ashish got in touch with us to tell us about their upcoming Palette interface, we immediately got excited. That’s because a lot of people have thought up ways to speed up your post-processing workflow with everything from video game controllers to MIDI controllers, but none of them hold a candle to Palette’s potential. Read more…

Flickr About to Receive Major Makeover

Flickr is reportedly set to push out a number of major design updates across the photo-sharing service’s website. Adrianne Jeffries of Betabeat recently met up with Flickr senior product manager Markus Spiering, who gave her a sneak peek at a number of extensive changes to the interface that will be rolling out at the end this month.

He then opened a new tab to show the spread, completely revamped. Suddenly the photos look more than four times their current size and lie neatly justified on the page, somehow jigsawing together without cropping or changing the order in which they appear.

The new photo view will hit on Feb. 28, Mr. Spiering said, and with it comes a new upload interface. Flickr’s uploading page now looks more like an app than a website. Goodbye, retro blue links. Hello, swoopy drag-and-drop.

Sounds a whole lot like Google+ photo sharing, huh? Betabeat reports coming away from the meeting “with the impression that Yahoo is not sleeping on Flickr” — great news for the faithful members of the service.

Flickr Is Getting a Major Makeover (via Thomas Hawk)

How to Make a Wooden AC Adapter for a Battery-Only Digital Camera

Many digital cameras are battery-only, and can’t be directly connected to an outlet for an infinite source of power. That’s ordinarily not a problem, but can become an issue if you attempt to do things like time-lapse imagery, for which the camera needs to stay powered and perfectly stationary for extended periods of time. That was the problem faced by Instructables member txoof with his Olympus E520. Handy with electronics and woodworking, he decided to build his own AC/DC interface for the camera, crafting a wooden mold that acts as a wall-powered “battery”.

If you have the same problem and aren’t afraid of sockets and buzz saws, check out his tutorial for instructions on how to do this yourself.

Wall (mains) Power for an Olympus E-510 (via Lifehacker)

Designer Creates “Touchband” Interface to Make Cameras More Usable

Designer Miha Feuš doesn’t think the user interfaces on low-end compact cameras are very useable for the average consumer, so earlier this year he set out to create a better camera interface. After a good amount of thinking, building, and testing, Feuš made this video to share his ideas, show off his prototype, and report on his results.

His design revolves around a “touchband”, which is a one-dimensional touch sensitive area positioned next to the screen. According to his user tests, the touchband is easier to use than both traditional button interfaces and newer touchscreen interfaces. Who knows, maybe one day we’ll know Feuš as the Jakob Nielsen of the camera world.

Minority Report-style Interface for Viewing Gigapixel Photos

Gigalinc is an “immersive photography” project by University of Lincoln student Samuel Cox that allows people to explore gigapixel photographs on a giant display using arm movements and hand gestures. Using an Xbox Kinect sensor for motion detection and a large cinema display, the resulting user interface is strikingly similar to the interface Tom Cruise uses in Minority Report.

(via TechCrunch)

13 Gigapixel Photo on a 22 Megapixel Interactive Display Wall

Students at the University of Tromso in Norway have created an interactive display wall using 28 separate projectors, which creates a 7168×3072, or 22 megapixel, display. Interactive with the display simply involves placing your hands in front of it. Touching the display itself is not necessary, and multitouch is supported. What better way to demonstrate the capabilities of such a system than zooming through a gigapixel photograph?

Gigapixel images are great, but navigating them on a regular sized display through a slow web browser isn’t such a great experience. This video shows how we navigate a 13.3 gigapixel image of Tromsø, Norway on a 22 megapixel display wall, using a custom, camera-based multi-touch interface and a custom system for high-performance navigation and visualization of high-resolution datasets.

Here’s an amazing video demonstrating the wall in action:

Ah… A glimpse of the future. We may soon find ourselves post-processing our photographs on our walls at home.

(via Engadget)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

Read more…