Posts Tagged ‘interesting’

There Are Giant Camera Resolution Test Charts Scattered Across the US

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When people test cameras and lenses for resolution, they commonly use special resolution test charts that are filled with black bars of varying lengths and thicknesses. They’re kind of like eye charts, except for cameras instead of eyeballs, and with lines instead of letters.

Well, did you know that in dozens of locations around the United States, there are gigantic resolution test charts on the ground?
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What a DSLR’s CMOS Sensor Looks Like Under a Microscope

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Jack over at the astrophotography blog The Landingfield has published a series of photographs showing what a digital camera’s CMOS sensor looks like when viewed through a microscope. The sensor (seen above) was taken from a broken Nikon D2H — a DSLR from back in the early 2000s.
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Exploring and Photographing the Sewers of Major Cities Around the World

Last year, New York-based guerrilla historian, urban explorer and photographer Steve Duncan gave an 18-minute talk (seen in the video above) to the audience at TEDxPhoenixville. Duncan spoke on his motivations for going deep into the underground infrastructure in major cities around the world, peeling back layers of a city to see and document things that are hidden to people above ground.
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Curious: A Photo That Appears to Show Tiny People Falling From the Sky

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Can you tell what this photograph is of? Snowflakes? Skydivers? Some kind of illustration involving stick figures? Here’s the description by the photographer behind the photo, Reddit user Toastbiscuit:

Was standing on a river bank surrounded my mosquitoes. Pointed my camera straight up and got this photo.

You can find a higher-resolution version of the image over on Imgur… in case you’d like to set your desktop wallpaper to a photograph of mosquitoes that look like tiny people, or something.

Portraits of People Photographed by Scott Schuman, The Sartorialist

Since its inception in 2005, street fashion photography blog The Sartorialist has become something of a bellwether in the fashion industry, turning photographer Scott Schuman into a kingmaker that can give ordinary fashionable folk 15 minutes of intense Internet fame by spotting them, shooting their photo, and publishing it to his blog.

Schuman recently hosted a party attended by many of the subjects seen in his posed street portraits. He took the opportunity to produce this beautiful short video that captures a followup-up portrait of a number of them.
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Why We Did, In Fact, Land on the Moon: A Photography-Based Proof

One of the most vehemently argued conspiracy theories of all time is that, in 1969, NASA did not actually land on the moon. Many different breakdowns of the photo and video footage have been used to make this point (think: flag waving, missing stars, etc), leading most conspiracy theorists to argue that the great Stanley Kubrick actually filmed the moon landing in a television studio.

Writer/Director S.G. Collins, however, disagrees — and he’s got the photographic/videographic reasoning to prove it. Fair warning, Mr. Collins does drop the occasional curse word throughout the video and the humor may be a bit dry for some people’s tastes, but he does offer fairly conclusive evidence to back up his point: while the technology to land on the moon did exist in ’69, the technology to fake it did not.

(via Fstoppers)

Photos Showing the Strange Similarities of Human Cities and Human Neurons

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In the side-by-side images above, the photo on the left shows a city as seen by astronauts on the International Space Station, and then photo on the right shows a photo of a neuron imaged with fluorescence microscopy. One is massive and seen from a grand scale, while the other is microscopic and cannot be seen by the human eye, yet they look strangely similar in their structure.

Infinity Imagined has a gallery of these comparisons of cities and neurons, showing the strange and striking similarities between the two.
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The Most Instagrammed Location of 2012 is an Airport in Bangkok

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There are well over 100 million users on Instagram (assuming a quarter of them didn’t just up and leave), and even though the typical Instagram photo stream consists of food and the family pet, there are certain places that show up more often than others. Times Square, The Eiffel Tower, Disneyland, the Bangkok Airport… wait… that last one seems out of place doesn’t it?

As it turns out, no. Not only is Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi Airport the number one most Instagrammed location of 2012, but Bangkok’s massive shopping mall, Siam Paragon, took second. Only then does the list become populated by the locations you might expect to see.
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The Photographs Norman Rockwell Used to Create His Famous Paintings

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Painter Norman Rockwell‘s illustrations graced the covers of countless magazines over the course of the 20th century, becoming a much-loved piece of American culture for their simple snapshots of life. You might recognize many of the works, and even the name behind the paintings, but did you know that virtually all of the images started out as photographs?
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Who is the Photographer Behind Photos Shot by the Curiosity Rover on Mars?

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We’ve written a number of posts regarding the NASA Curiosity rover’s photography on Mars, but have you ever wondered who it is that “presses the shutter”? If you have, you’re not alone. The Planetary Society recently received the question as well, and has published an official explanation from NASA:

It would be nice if the pictures took themselves. But it takes a village, it seems, to get a picture taken on Mars [...] for a single snap shot you might have the Geology Science Theme Group conceive and design it en masse; the PUL-1 plan it; the entire (on staff) Science Operations Working Group discuss it and include it in the daily plan, the PUL-2 actually write it, and the engineering uplink team review and approve it before the Ace hits the button to radiate it, with the sol’s command, bundle to the rover. That’s a group the size of a small village.

Camera operator Mark Lemmon also talks about how the team often goes to great lengths to nail lighting and composition. With so many resources drained into each photo, casual snapshots aren’t exactly Curiosity’s thing.

Who is the photographer behind Mars rover photos? Answer from Mark Lemmon [The Planetary Society]