Posts Tagged ‘interesting’

PechaKucha 20 for 20 Presentation Style Makes Its Foray Into Photography

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PechaKucha is a presentation style that gives presenters exactly 20 slides and 20 seconds per slide to get their point across. Designed by architects Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham in Tokyo in 2003, what started as a weekly show-and-tell format at their firm has become a world-wide presentation phenomenon that recently broke into the world of photography. Read more…

Photo Mosaics That Show Just How Much Internet Reproductions “Lie”

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Fernanda ViƩgas and Martin Wattenberg are scientists by trade and artists at heart. They work as the leads of a Google research group in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and are constantly on the lookout for interesting (and artistic) ways to visualize data.

Back in 2011, they came up with an interesting project titled “The Art Of Reproduction,” which shows how digital reproductions of photographs (and paintings) found on the Internet are far from “truthful.”
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The History of Photoshop as Told by Its Founding Fathers

Back in 2010, Adobe put out a short documentary called “Startup Memories — The Beginning of Photoshop” to celebrate the program’s 20-year anniversary by recalling its past. Somehow, that documentary slipped through our fingers at the time, but seeing as we’ve already started a conversation on how Photoshop is “remixing the world,” we thought it was an opportune time to share this blast from the past.

In the video, the founders of Photoshop — John Knoll, Thomas Knoll, Russell Brown, and Steve Guttman — sit down around a table and talk about the series of coincidences and circumstances that led to the creation of the tool that has visually redefined our times. Read more…

Neat Visualizations of the 1 Million+ Pics Shot from Space by NASA Astronauts

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Since NASA’s first mission to the International Space Station back in 2000, astronauts on board the artificial satellite have snapped over 1.1 million photographs. What’s neat is that every one of those photographs is available to the general public through a giant online database.

Open source rocket scientist Nathan Bergey decided to use his coding skills to do a little digging through the image archive, and ended up creating some beautiful visualizations showing where the images were shot in relation to our planet.
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Hear What It’s Like to Serve as an Official White House Photographer

As a followup to our post earlier today about former White House photographer Eric Draper’s work, here’s an interesting and relevant 17-minute-long story that aired on NPR in January of this year. It’s an interview with former presidential photographers Eric Draper and Robert McNeely, who photographed the presidencies of George W. Bush and Bill Clinton (respectively).
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Six Years Ago, Apple Made a Crowd Gasp With Pinch to Zoom and Swiping

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If you want a taste of how fast technology progresses in the world of digital photography, just look at the consumer camera industry through the lens of a company that continues to make a big splash: Apple.

When Steve Jobs unveiled the original iPhone on January 9, 2007 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, cameras on phones were horrible and viewing those shoddy pictures was a pain. Then, almost overnight, the smartphone photography revolution — and the slow demise of the compact camera — began.
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Apple Thought About Naming the iPhone “TriPod”

For taping my jumps. Inyo National Forest.

“How’s the image quality on the TriPod 5?” That’s a question you would perhaps be hearing these days if certain decisions had been made differently years ago over in Apple HQ. When the Cupertino-based company was brainstorming names for the smartphone that would eventually be called the “iPhone,” one of the names that was being considered was “TriPod.”
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What 10FPS on a Nikon D4 Looks Like in 1920FPS Super Slow Motion

It’s not uncommon for digital cameras to have burst modes as fast as 10 frames per second these days — especially in mirrorless and pellicle mirror cameras — but do you think you have a good understanding of just how fast 10FPS is? If not, check out this video by YouTube user krnabrnydziobak, who pointed a Phantom Miro eX2 at a Nikon D4 to see what 10FPS looks like when captured at a staggering 1920FPS.
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How PetaPixel Stacks Up Against Other Top 100 Blogs in Age and Gender

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We now take a break from our regularly scheduled programming to direct your attention to an interesting study that was published yesterday by Pingdom. The website tracking company decided to analyze the demographics of the world’s top 100 blogs (according to Technorati), sorting them by reader age and gender. It’s findings regarding PetaPixel caught our eye.
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Photos of the White House Gutted During Its Truman Reconstruction

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Did you know that the White House was completely gutted and rebuilt on the inside between 1949 and 1952? After decades of poor maintenance, the building was in danger of collapsing in 1948, which forced President Harry Truman to move out and commission a complete gutting and rebuilding of the building’s insides.

The U.S. National Archives has been publishing photographs showing the gutted White House to its Flickr photostream.
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