Posts Tagged ‘inspiring’

National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards on Pushing the Boundaries of Adventure

Adventure photographer Cory Richards gave this inspiring talk earlier this year at National Geographic Live! He tells the story of his “lifelong quest to push the limits of adventure and storytelling.” After becoming the first American to summit any 8,000-meter peak during winter at age 29, Richards was awarded the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Award 2012.

If you enjoyed this talk, be sure to check out the two other videos about Richards’ life and work here and here.

Photographers Banding Together to Help Down-and-Out Colleague

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Photographers around the country are banding together to figure out the best way to help out a once-prominent photojournalist who has ended up homeless and panhandling on the streets of Manhattan. Read more…

Youth in Focus: Changing Lives in Seattle Through Art and Photography

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When I saw the work of photographer “Fiddle Oak” last month, I was so blown away by the level of maturity, boldness, and confidence exuded from his images. He’s 14, people! And according to the story, he’s been creating shooting and manipulating the work since he was 8.
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World Press Photo Winner Had to Sell His Camera Last Year to Survive

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26-year-old freelance photojournalist Daniel Rodrigues landed the biggest ‘win’ of his photographic career this year when it was announced that his photo Football in Guinea-bissau (shown above) had won 1st prize in the prestigious World Press Photo competition’s Daily Life category.

The win was more than a fancy new line on his resume: you see, just two years ago Rodrigues was flat broke, and this award will allow him to resume the career that he almost had to abandon to survive.
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Signal vs. Noise: Look For the Signal in Your Life, and Not The Noise

Photographer Zack Arias created this video titled Signal vs. Noise to help his fellow photogs refocus their lives and careers. His advice: “Look for the signal in your life, and not the noise.” Arias writes,

As 2012 was coming to an end […] I felt as though my brain was full. There wasn’t any more room in it. I can’t take any more information. My head was filled with noise and trying to find anything of any substance was difficult. I would do my best to remember what I was going to the store to buy, but when I walked in the door I couldn’t remember. I’d sit in meetings with my studio manager where she would ask about the direction for the new year and I’d draw a blank. “I don’t know.” My mind was filled with thoughts but I couldn’t string them together in a coherent way to save my life.

Each year I take the month of December off from social media. I like to disappear, go work on stuff, and come back feeling fresh. Nearing the end of 2012 I knew I needed to leave all of that behind sooner than December and most likely stay off of it until the spring. My mind was stuck on static and the volume was set to eleven.

Arias has developed a number of strategies for strengthening signal and killing noise. Head on over to Scott Kelby’s blog for the whole shebang.

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Zack Arias! [Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider]

The Ethereal World of Extreme Landscape Photographer Alexandre Deschaumes

Self-taught photographer Alexander Deschaumes only started making photos back in 2003, but his dedication to the craft and his thirst for jaw-dropping landscapes have brought him a long way since then. Deschaumes braves extreme weather and hazardous landforms, going to locations that many landscape photographers would never dare venture, all for the sake of his images. The 2-minute video above offers a look into his world of extreme landscape photography.
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The Benefit of Researching a Subject’s Life Before Shooting a Portrait

Here’s a nice little video in which photographer Matthew Jordan Smith tells the story of a portrait session he had years ago with American actor/dancer/singer Gregory Hines. After finding himself in a sticky situation with a subject that wouldn’t offer the personality and emotion Smith wanted to capture, he reached deep into the knowledge of Hines that he had accumulated through his research; one particular fact saved the shoot.
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Photog Documented Being Stranded in the Antarctic Nearly 100 Years Ago

If you ever need some encouragement for sticking with photography when times get tough, you should read about the adventures of Frank Hurley. Born in Australia in 1885, he took up photography as a young man and eventually became skilled enough to be selected as the official photographer for multiple expeditions to Antarctica and for the Australian military in both world wars. Among his many photographic escapades, one stands out from among the rest: being stranded in the Antarctic for nearly two years.
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Stunning Time-Lapse Portrait of Portland Created with 300,000+ Photos

This inspiring time-lapse video of Portland, Oregon was created by Uncage the Soul over the course of 51 days in March and April for the TEDx Portland conference. They captured 308,829 separate photographs at 50 different locations in and around the city. Each second in the video took an average of 3.8 hours of work to create. Their hard work paid off, and the film was given a standing ovation by the sellout crowd when it premiered.

(via Doobybrain)

Stolen Moments: Matt Stuart on His Fascination with Street Photography

Here’s an interesting video in which street photographer Matt Stuart shares some of his work and talks about his love for street photography. In an interview with More Intelligent Life, Stuart states,

I’d like to be a mirror. And show people who live where I live what they’re like or what we’re doing or how we act. How we live. I think Garry Winogrand said he looks at people as animals and aren’t we bizarre? It is that standing back and trying to show us how we behave, and isn’t it funny or isn’t it sad or isn’t it ironic? I love how people act in public places.

One interesting statement he makes in the video: “the lovely thing about street photography is […] that the best stuff there’s absolutely no way you can stage, or even think of. It just like… happened, and isn’t that weird? Then it’s gone.”

(via ISO 1200)