Posts Tagged ‘imaging’

TED Talk: Photographing the Whole Earth Every Day With an Army of Tiny Satellites

Back in June, we reported that a company called Planet Labs is working to improve the efficiency of satellite photography by using a large number of tiny satellites instead of a single satellite.

Company co-founder and CEO Will Marshal recently gave a TED Talk (shown above) that sheds some light on what the company is doing.
Read more…

First High-Res Public Imaging Satellite Set to Launch in August

A month ago, the US Government lifted restrictions on high-detail satellite images. Previously, these restrictions prohibited the capture of anything under 1.64 feet in size; now that they’re gone, a number of companies are anxious to launch their latest and greatest satellites and bring high res satellite imagery to the public for the very first time.

And the first to finish line is Lockheed Martin, whose DigitalGlobe‘s high-res WorldView-3 satellite is set to take off in August.

Read more…

Tiny, Lensless Sensor May Someday Turn Any Device Into a Rudimentary Camera

RambusSensor

This latest device from technology licensing company Rambus goes to show: when you combine information-gathering sensors with powerful algorithms, you can yield some incredible results.

Developed by research scientist Patrick Gill, this 200 micron diameter glass sensor is capable of capturing an image of remarkable quality for its size. Etched with a spiral pattern, the light reflecting off of whatever object is being “photographed” is transferred as a pattern, in the form of spherical light, to the CMOS sensor. Read more…

Kodak Alaris Will Keep the Kodak Legacy Alive, Has ‘No Plans’ to Stop Selling Film

kodakalaris1

Now that Eastman Kodak’s bankruptcy woes are over and the company has switched its focus primarily to commercial printing, its name probably won’t show up here as often as it once did. But that doesn’t mean that the Kodak photographic legacy is dead.

One of the steps Eastman Kodak took to get out of bankruptcy was to sell its personalized and document imaging businesses to the UK Kodak Pension Plan (KPP), and that has birthed a company that plans to keep that legacy alive: Kodak Alaris. Read more…

Cooperation Wins Out Over Confrontation in the ILC Market

sonyilc

For travel shooters and those looking to keep their kit light, new Interchangeable Lens Compacts (ILC) have been a major boon. But the real beneficiaries of the rise of this new system — still less than five years old — are the companies that make them. However, in order to maximize those benefits, manufacturers of ILCs need to establish the format as viable and resilient. For some, that means working together rather than against one another. Read more…

Time-Lapse Photos of Embryos May Lead to Heathier In-Vitro Babies

Embryo at 6 weeks

An interesting new imaging technique in use by fertility experts at the CARE fertility clinic in the United Kingdom may be the key to increasing the likelihood of a successful a IVF therapy. The process involves snapping thousands of images of embryos in development in order to help doctors better select which embryos to implant successfully.
Read more…

Beautiful Animations Showing MRI Scans of Fruits and Vegetables

Most photographers and artists will never have the opportunity to make the kind of images that Andy Ellison does. As an MRI technologist at Boston University Medical School, Ellison has access to extremely expensive imaging machines. More specifically, he runs a research-only Philips 3 Tesla MRI machine. When he’s not using it for official purposes, he experiments with it by placing various fruits, vegetables, and flowers inside. The resulting still images and animations are beautiful and abstract, and form a project that he calls “Inside Insides.” The images above show a pineapple and an artichoke.
Read more…

Comparing Digital Imaging Technology to the Human Eye

There’s an interesting discussion going on over at the DPReview forums regarding how the human eye compares to the technology we have in digital cameras.

Here are some of the findings that were compiled from various sources on the web:

  • Sensor size: 22mm in diameter
  • Resolution: 576 megapixels
  • Sensitivity: 1 – 800 ISO
  • Focal length: 22mm – 35mm
  • Aperture: f/2.1 – f/8.3

Another interesting idea that came up was the possibility of using the human eye as the lens and sensor for future imaging devices:

Maybe future “cameras” will actually link to your eyes – since the eyeball is such a great lens, who knows? Getting signal from the eye is the trick – would require a surgical implant or a means of reading brainwaves. Maybe that’s 200 years out – similar time [frame] the Mayo clinic is talking about for correcting double/triple vision.

Perhaps in the future we’ll all be documenting our lives at 576 megapixels through our eyes and ears, and storing the photos and videos on petabyte external hard drives at home.

What do you think of this discussion? Is there anything that jumps out at you as being wrong, or do you agree with the comparison for the most part?


Image credit: Eye (please add some funny TAGs) by Michele Catania

Vinyl Records at 1000x Magnification

Ever wonder what a vinyl record looks like under an electron microscope? Okay, probably not. Luckily, there’s people who do, including Chris Supranowitz, who created a number of electron microscope images for a course at the University of Rochester.

Here’s a photograph of the record grooves captured by Supranowitz at 500x magnification. Those dark chunks you see are dust particles.

This one was shot at 1000x magnification. The record begins to look like the Grand Canyon.

These images were created in the Spring of 2005 for the course Opt 307/407: Practical Electron Microscopy and Advanced Topics. Other projects used the electron microscope to examine such things as snowflakes and bird feathers.

To see more of the amazing images captured by Supranowitz, check out the final project page.

(via Reckon)