Posts Tagged ‘iconic’

Leica III Behind Iconic ‘Flag Over Reichstag’ Photo Going Up for Auction in November

bonhamsleica2

It’s a day heavy with beautiful Leica news. First, we shared the photos and story behind this one-of-a-Kind Leica M4 that you can’t have, and now we’ve caught wind of another iconic Leica that is going up for sale (and is probably just as unattainable for most of us).

What makes this Leica (a Leica III, to be exact) special isn’t some particular one-of-a-kind design, it’s the fact that this is the actual camera used by photographer Yevgeni Khaldei to take his iconic Raising a Flag Over The Reichstag photograph in 1945. Read more…

A Look Back at 2 of the Most Iconic Photos in Soccer History

With the World Cup in full swing, CNN Digital’s director of photographer, Simon Barnett, has his hands full. Each day of the cup, his job is to look through somewhere in the neighborhood of 10,000 images and decide which make the cut.

In this short video above, he explains what separates the amazing images from the great-but-not-good-enough crowd, and takes us through what it is that made two iconic soccer photographs so iconic. Read more…

DigitalRev Says Happy 60th Birthday to the Iconic Leica M3 with a Hands-On Review

This week marks the 60th anniversary since Leica introduced the now-iconic M3, a camera many consider to be the best Leica ever produced and still the most successful M-Series camera ever made at over 220,000 units sold by the time production ended in 1966.

And so, to pay homage to this titan of photographic history, DigitalRev decided to give the M3 a proper video and take it out onto the streets of Hong Kong for a good old hands-on review. Read more…

Platon Tells the Powerful Story Behind His Portrait of Nine Civil Rights Heroes

It seems CNN is planning to do a whole series with famed portraitist Platon, because only a couple of weeks after they released his BTS account of the portrait he took of Vladimir Putin, they’ve put out another, much more powerful video. Read more…

Lomo Brings Back the Iconic, 50-Year-Old Russar MR-2 Wide Angle Lens

Lomography’s already has some experience partnering with Russian lens manufacturers. And given how successful the Zenit partnership and Lomo’s recreation of the Petzval lens has been, they’ve decided to do it again, this time with the Russar+. Read more…

The Story Behind the World’s Most Viewed Photo, the Windows XP ‘Bliss’ Wallpaper

As of yesterday, Microsoft no longer supports Windows XP. And in honor of one of the longest-living operating systems, the above video takes a look at the story behind what is arguably XP’s most recognized quality: the ‘Bliss’ wallpaper that came stock on every machine. Read more…

BTS: Recreating Iconic Hollywood Portraits Using Photographers As Models

Photographers Sue Bryce and Felix Kunze recently took a unique approach to recreating some of the classic Hollywood portraits of days gone by. Using a group of extremely talented female photographers, Bryce and Kunze had these lovely ladies act as models for the recreations. Read more…

UK Roller Coaster Workers Recreate Iconic ‘Lunch Atop a Skyscraper’ Photo from 1932

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The photo above probably looks very familiar to you. Steel workers, eating lunch, sitting up very high in the air… rings a bell doesn’t it? If you still haven’t figured it out, the image above is a tongue-in-cheek recreation of the iconic 1932 photo “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” by Charles C. Ebbets. Read more…

LIFE’s Classic Photo Essay That Shined a Harsh Light on Heroin Addiction

Bill Eppridge's iconic 1965 work documented the horrors of heroin addiction in New York City.

Mar 04, 2014 · TJ Donegan

Mind-Blowing TV Spot Recreates Six Iconic Images in One Uninterrupted Shot

This TV Spot is the height of creativity, and we absolutely love it. In 50 seconds and one uninterrupted flowing video shot, UK directing duo US and advertising agency Grey (the guys behind the amazing exploding spices commercial) pay tribute to six completely unique, culturally iconic images by expertly recreating one after the other. Read more…