Posts Tagged ‘howto’

How to Shoot Great Sunrise Photography

In this video from Master Photo Workshops photographer Jim Zuckerman shows you how he creates his iconic sunrise photography, using a beautiful lighthouse as his subject. He begins with the basics of choosing your subject and exposure well and then continues on to explain the need to move quickly, “work the scene,” and understand that auto white balance works against you in sunrise and sunset scenes.

The information is straightforward, maybe even basic, but it leads to some amazing photos.

(via ISO1200)

Portraits of Famous People Shot Using Various Photographic Techniques

Washington DC-based photographer Sam Hurd has a series titled “Epic Portraits” that consists of portraits of famous individuals captured using techniques such as the Brenizer method, freelensing, and compositing. What’s neat is that each photograph has its own behind-the-scenes page detailing how it was created (the gear, goal, vision, story, and lesson learned).
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How to Photograph International Space Station Flyovers

Photographer Shane Murphy has written up an informative step-by-step tutorial on how you can photograph the International Space Station as it whizzes by overhead.

First things first, the most important thing to do is to plan well. Forward planning is vital to any night sky shot, along with a steady tripod and a warm coat. There are quite a few websites and twitter feeds that can help you with your planning. Even though it only takes about an hour and a half for the ISS to complete an orbit of the planet, you could be waiting quite some time under the night skies before the station appears above. The station only appears for a short time (about 1-2 weeks) and then re-appears again many weeks later. This is due to the orbit of the station above earth.

You can check out a collection of ISS photographs he has taken here.

Imaging the ISS (via Boing Boing)


Image credit: Photograph by Shane Murphy and used with permission

Composite Diner Photograph Shot with 24 Lights and 20 Subjects over 12 Hours

Here’s a video in which photographer Ryan Schude walks through how he went about shooting a photograph titled “The Diner”. The image involved 24 lights, 20 subjects, and 12 hours of shooting. Check out his crazy lighting diagram and the finished photo.

(via Scott Kelby via Fstoppers)

How to Compose Shots When Shooting Skateboarders

Here’s a tutorial by skateboarding photographer Michael Burnett in which he discusses various composition tips and techniques. His area of expertise is in shooting skateboarders, but the tips are very applicable for other types of photography as well.
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How to Make a Fluorescent Lighting Setup for Less Than $200

Here’s a tutorial by photographer Joe Edelman that teaches how you can build a studio lighting setup with fluorescent lights for under $200. You can find a detailed parts list over in the description of the video on YouTube.
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Viral Photographs Bring Instant Success

Photographers used to spend lifetimes building up their portfolios and networks before their work became widely known to a global audience, but with the advent of the Internet, the fact that anything can “go viral” is completely changing the equation for success.
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How to Shoot Sound Painting Photos with Paint and a Speaker

Last week we featured some “sound painting” photographs by Martin Klimas, captured by using a speaker to vibrate paint. Here’s a video tutorial by some Arizona State University Polytechnic students demonstrating how you can do your own “sound painting” photos. They use a thrift store speaker covered with a garbage bag and some Crayola poster paint.

(via ISO 1200)

Street Photography Do’s and Don’ts

Kai of DigitalRev shares some tips — both serious and humorous — on the art of street photography.

(via ISO 1200)

How to Make a DIY Camera Wristlet

Elizabeth Giorgi of Being Geek Chic made this step-by-step video tutorial teaching how to make a stylish DIY camera wristlet using some fabric and iron-on fusible.

DIY Weekend: Camera wristlet (via DIYP via Make)