Posts Tagged ‘howto’

How to Transfer Your Photos Onto Wax Candles

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Here’s an idea for a fun weekend project and/or personalized gift: make some custom candles that feature your photographs. It’s actually incredibly easy, and you may already have the necessary materials lying around at home.
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How to Turn an iPad and iPhone Into a Negative Film Viewing Station

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A few years ago, we wrote about how phones can be used as negative film strip viewers by simply inverting the screens. Swedish photographer Adam af Ekenstam took the idea a step further by using an iPad and iPhone together as a simple yet powerful negative viewing station.
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A Trick for Sharpening High ISO Photos in Photoshop Without Adding More Noise

UK-based glamour photographer Markp created this short video tutorial on how he sharpens photos captured at high ISOs in Photoshop without adding more noise to the image. His technique involves creating a High Pass duplicate layer of the photo, desaturating it and reducing noise on it, sharpening that layer, and then blending it into the original photo with Photoshop’s “Linear Light” blend mode.

(via Mashup Mark via Reddit)

Lighting a Product Photo by Light Painting with Your Phone in a Long Exposure Shot

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Here’s a fun and very easy way to do professional product photography light painting using your iPhone, or any other phone or tablet for that matter. The bigger the screen the better the results, but a standard phone screen will absolutely do the job.

This tutorial uses the light painting technique. Rather than the typical light painting technique where the light is used as the subject to draw out words or simple pictures; this technique uses light painting to light, highlight, and backlight the your subject. This will give you studio quality professional product photos worthy of any usage.
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A Primer on Using Photoshop’s Liquify Filter for Realistic Retouching

Here’s a tutorial by New York City-based photographer Jeff Rojas that offers a crash course on how to use the Liquify Filter in Photoshop to make realistic retouches to your images.

“The liquify tool has a bad rap in the media for making unrealistic body proportions,” Rojas says, “and that doesn’t have to be the case.” His goal is to show how to best use the tool’s features in order to give your photos more impact while retaining natural body proportions.

(via Jeff Rojas via ISO 1200)

How The Rescued Film Project Processes C-41 Color Film at Home

Photographer Levi Bettweiser of the Rescued Film Project regularly processes large batches of old films of different styles and eras. Earlier this year he received quite a bit of attention after finding, processing, and sharing 31 rolls of undeveloped film from World War II.

Bettweiser recently spent 14 hours processing a batch of C-41 color film at home. The 10-minute video above is a walkthrough on his technique and workflow. With processing labs getting more expensive and disappearing, this could be of interest to you if you’ve ever considered developing C-41 film yourself.

(via Rescued Film Project via ISO 1200)

An In-Depth Tutorial on the Many Uses of a White Seamless Backdrop

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A white seamless background is a staple of photography and video studios. Photographer Zack Arias of DEDPXL has created a fantastic (and lengthy) two-part tutorial on the basics of the setup.
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Three Approaches to Publishing Your Photo Book

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There comes a point in a photographer’s life when publishing a book seems like a logical step. The coffee table book represents a platonic ideal for a photo project that is both long-term and worthy of considerations by others. Yet, even with the advent of high quality on-demand solutions like Blurb, book publishing is still fraught with challenges. Here are three different approaches to book publishing in the 21st century.
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A Practical Guide to Creating Superresolution Photos with Photoshop

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We’ve seen it in plenty of thriller/crime solver TV shows and movies: upon reviewing some grainy and very low-resolution surveillance footage, someone inevitably asks the technician, “can you zoom in on that and enhance it?” Then, with the quick press of a few masterfully placed keystrokes and bleepy computer sounds, the image is suddenly enhanced with vastly increased resolution and a key plot device is revealed.
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How to Protect Your Camera Gear from a Robber

Renowned Magnum and National Geographic photographer David Alan Harvey offers this sweet 40-second tip on how you can protect the theft of your camera gear. It’s pretty simple: you just need to be wise about how you wear your camera bag and knowledgable in the art of judo.

(via David Alan Harvey via ISO 1200)