Posts Tagged ‘house’

Massachusetts Legislature Passes ‘Upskirt’ Ban in Response to Court Ruling

skirt1

Well that was fast. Only a day after news broke of the controversial Massachusetts ruling that ‘upskirt’ photographs were in fact legal according to the states Peeping Tom laws, the state’s legislature has responded by passing a ban. Read more…

Connecticut Bill Could Make Police Liable for Interfering with Photographers

In the past year — and especially with the growth of the “occupy” movement — police interfering with photographers or pedestrians trying to snap a photo of them has been in the news quite a lot. Just yesterday we reported on the Olympics’ security guards who landed in hot water after harassing photogs shooting from public land. In the past, this was no problem, as police officers had little to fear in way of personal liability when they interfered; however, a new Connecticut bill — the first of its kind — may soon change that.
Read more…

Make a Custom Snow Globe Using Photos of Your House

Here’s a fantastic project/gift idea for those of you who are both tech-savvy and artsy: make a custom snow globe of your house. The process involves capturing photographs of the house from all sides, turning the images into a 3D model of the home using a 3D modeling program (e.g. Google Sketchup), turning the 3D model into a physical object using a 3D printing service (e.g. Shapeways), and then sticking the object into a custom snow globe kit. Qarl has published a step-by-step tutorial on the process.

the weather outside is frightful (via Boing Boing)

How to Make Gingerbread Cameras

If you’re a photographer and not an architect, why settle for boring ol’ gingerbread houses this holiday season? Gingerbread cameras are where it’s at! They’re not very difficult to build — you just need to know the correct sizes and shapes to cut out. Photojojo has published a step-by-step tutorial on how you can make your own.

How to Make Gingerbread Cameras [Photojojo]

House Finale Filmed with the Canon 5D Mark II Airs Tonight

Just a reminder: the season finale of the popular TV show House, which was filmed entirely with the Canon 5D Mark II, will be airing tonight. The fact that the show turned to the HDSLR was one of the big stories last month, after the show’s director Greg Yaitanes made the announcement on Twitter and had a Q&A session via the service.

Canon also put out a press release today congratulating the show. Yuichi Ishizuka, the executive VP of Canon USA is quoted as saying,

We take great pleasure in congratulating the cast and crew of HOUSE on completing the first network television episode to be completely shot on a DSLR camera. This milestone marks a paradigm shift in the way professional cinematographers and filmmakers capture HD video.

Will you be tuning in to see how it turned out?

Sneak Peek at House Episode Filmed with the Canon 5D Mark II

One of the biggest stories last month was that an upcoming episode of the popular TV series House was filmed entirely with the Canon 5D Mark II. I know a lot of you are looking forward to seeing how it turned out, but now you can get a sneak peek: Fox has uploaded a short teaser of the episode to YouTube. It’s not HD, but it’s a pretty neat glimpse into what they were able to do:

The episode is set to air Monday, May 17th.

(via Philip Bloom)

House Season Finale Filmed Entirely with Canon 5D Mark II

The season finale of the popular TV show House, which will air on May 17th, was filmed entirely with the Canon 5D Mark II. cinema5D overheard the plan last month and Greg Yaitanes, the director of the show, has confirmed it through a tweet in which we made himself open to questions.

We’ll republish some of the interesting questions and answers here, interview style:

@MVRamunno: What is the difference in how it looks on a TV screen compared to a regular camera?

Greg Yaitanes: richer. shallow focus pulls the actors faces to forground [sic]

@oamad0101: How many frames per second and why a Canon 5D Mark II?

GY: 24p and wanted it for ease of use in tight spaces.

@unikissa: Ok, seriously. Can you tell us something about the lenses you used?

GY: all the canon primes and the 24-70 and the 70-200 zoom

@sarabury: Did you have to change any of your working practices to fit in with differences between the 5D and a typical setup?

GY: some. focus was hard with these lenses but more “cine-style” lenses are being made as we speak.

@marykir: were you using CF cards for storage or some sort of mass storage mod? seems like you would need a lot of cards :)

GY: some 18gb or something like that card. gave us 22 min of footage.

@Drdiagnostic: How was the quality as compared 2 the traditional camera used in shooting?

GY: i loved it and feel it’s the future. cameras that can give you these looks

@klizma: How did you manage to stabilize the camera in tight spaces? Any special kind of brackets?

GY: no. mostly gave it a hand held feel. or on a small tripod

This is quite an endorsement for Canon, with a network giant entrusting the finale of one of its most popular shows to the 5D Mark II (which happens to be the first digital camera to take the Presidential portrait as well).

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the popularity of the show:

In 2008, House was distributed in a total of 66 countries. With an audience of over 81.8 million worldwide, it was the most watched television show on the globe and far surpassed the viewership figures of the leading TV dramas the previous two years

If you haven’t yet, check out the short film, The Last 3 Minutes, which we posted earlier today. It was filmed with the same camera.

(via Canon 5D tips)

Camouflage Your Thermostat with Photos

Have an ugly thermostat in your home that you wish you could hide when not in use? Hanging photographs on your wall could help you make it much less noticeable. Apartment Therapy suggests hiding it in plain sight by using framed photos that are similar in appearance:

Weather in the Northeast being what it is, our in-wall thermostats, radiators and air conditioners are usually only used for a fraction of the year and the rest of the time they serve as unsightly additions to our décor. [...]

Hide it in plain sight: We love how the thermostat blends perfectly into Chancie’s family photo wall. As part of the composition of frames it doesn’t stand out — past house sitters have even had trouble finding it.

If you’ve always wanted to hang up some photos, perhaps this could give you a push into making it finally happen.

(via Lifehacker)