Posts Tagged ‘home’

Redoing My Home Office Space for the New Wedding Photography Season

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My name is Eric Brushett, and I’m a full time wedding photographer based in Hamden, Connecticut. I recently redid my home office space for the 2015 wedding season. Here’s a look at the process and the final result.
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A Glimpse Inside the Photo Palace That Photographer Jay Maisel Sold for $55 Million

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Back in 1966, renowned photographer Jay Maisel purchased a giant 6-floor, 35,000-square-foot, 72-room building at 190 Bowery in Manhattan for $102,000. The former NYC bank became his family’s home for the next half century, and the purchase has been described as possibly “the greatest real estate coup of all time“.

Here’s why: in late 2014, Maisel sold the valuable property to real estate investor Aby Rosen for a whopping $55 million.
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7 Simple DIY Photography Tips and Tricks Using Only Household Items

The team over at COOPH today shared an insightful video that describes 7 DIY photography tips that use nothing more than items you have lying around the house. From can koozies to tights, a number of unusual household products make a cameo and help you add a unique, homemade element to your photo game. Read more…

Triptych Portraits of Japanese People at Work, Home, and Play

For his project titled Peep, Japanese photographer Koji Takiguchi aimed to share glimpses into the lives of his fellow countrymen by capturing triptychs showing them at work, home, and play. He photographed people ranging from office workers to security guards, photographing them on the job, resting at home, and engaging in their favorite pastime.
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Make a Custom Snow Globe Using Photos of Your House

Here’s a fantastic project/gift idea for those of you who are both tech-savvy and artsy: make a custom snow globe of your house. The process involves capturing photographs of the house from all sides, turning the images into a 3D model of the home using a 3D modeling program (e.g. Google Sketchup), turning the 3D model into a physical object using a 3D printing service (e.g. Shapeways), and then sticking the object into a custom snow globe kit. Qarl has published a step-by-step tutorial on the process.

the weather outside is frightful (via Boing Boing)

How to Light, Shoot, and Stitch a Photo of a Home Interior

Here’s a video in which interior photographer Roger Brooks walks through how he goes about lighting, photographing, and stitching residential interior photographs.

Giant Picture Frame Doubles as a Table

Verena Lang of Ivy Design came up with this brilliant idea of a table that conveniently folds up into a giant picture frame when it isn’t needed. They’re built out of wood, plexiglass, and stainless steel, and cost about $2,200 on the Ivy Design site. Of course, you could always try your hand at building your own!

Picture Table (via DVICE via Make via Lifehacker)

How to Make a Photo Showing “Little People” on a Bookshelf

Photo enthusiast Robert Simpson created this informative behind-the-scenes video detailing how he created a composite photograph showing tiny children running along a bookshelf. Although a ton of planning and preparation went into the shot, everything was done at home on a small budget rather than in a fancy studio. This may inspire you to dream a little bigger using your current resources.

(via Fstoppers)

How to Compose Shots When Shooting the Interiors of Homes

This great video lesson by San Francisco-based interior photographer Scott Hargis teaching how to compose shots when photographing the interiors of homes. Stepping into the scene itself like Hargis does is a great way to teach composition.

How to Photograph Buildings Using Two Canon 430EX Speedlites

Here’s an educational time-lapse tutorial by Los Angeles-based architectural photographer Mike Kelley in which he walks through how he goes about photographing buildings. His technique might be described “manual HDR” — after shooting the building over a longish period of time to capture different lightings, he then enters the scene and lights different areas of the building using two Canon 430EX Speedlites. Afterward, he loads the stills into Photoshop and selects different portions of the scene from different photos depending on the lighting he wants. The finished composite photo ends up looking as if it were lit by a large number of Speedlites.

(via Strobist via Fstoppers)