Posts Tagged ‘history’

Photographer Hunts for Vintage Cameras That Contain Undeveloped Film

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Two years ago, photographer Chris A. Hughes purchased a 1914 French Richard Verascope camera (shown above) from an elderly man who was clearing out his camera collection in preparation for retirement. When he got into his car after the purchase, Hughes was surprised to find two packages of slides in the camera’s leather case.

Upon closer examination, he discovered that the photographs on the slides were captured by a French soldier during World War I.
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Android Was Originally Built for Cameras Rather Than Phones, Founder Says

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The Android operating system has been expanding beyond the world of smartphones and into the realm of “smartcameras” as of late, but did you know that by doing so it has simply gone full circle? That’s right: Android was originally intended for digital cameras rather than for phones.
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The Father of Stop Motion Animation and His Films Starring Dead Bugs

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Stop motion animation was already being used in the late 1890’s as a way to make objects in films move by “magic,” but full stop-motion animated films like the ones of today didn’t come to be until around 1910. When they did, one of the great pioneers of the technique was Russian photographer and entomologist Wladyslaw Starewicz. Read more…

The History of Photoshop as Told by Its Founding Fathers

Back in 2010, Adobe put out a short documentary called “Startup Memories — The Beginning of Photoshop” to celebrate the program’s 20-year anniversary by recalling its past. Somehow, that documentary slipped through our fingers at the time, but seeing as we’ve already started a conversation on how Photoshop is “remixing the world,” we thought it was an opportune time to share this blast from the past.

In the video, the founders of Photoshop — John Knoll, Thomas Knoll, Russell Brown, and Steve Guttman — sit down around a table and talk about the series of coincidences and circumstances that led to the creation of the tool that has visually redefined our times. Read more…

Free Digital Versions of Old Photography Books That Are in the Public Domain

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Project Gutenberg is a digital library volunteer effort that takes old public domain and converts them into freely available eBooks for the benefit of the general public. Founded back in 1971, the library now has over 42,000 items in its collection.

Among the books in its collection are a number of old books on the subject of photography. One such book is the 1881 title, The Art and Practice of Silver Printing by Capt. Abney and H. P. Robinson (shown above).
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Visit the World’s Oldest Photo Museum Through Google Art Project

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Opened in 1949, the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York is the world’s oldest museum dedicated to photography. It’s world renowned for its collection of more than 400,000 photos and negatives dating back to when the medium was first invented.

If you would like to check out some of the museum’s photos but can’t make the trip out to Rochester, there’s now a sleek new way for you to browse the imagery. The museum announced this week that it has become the first photo museum to join the Google Art Project.
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The First Webcam Was Invented to Check Coffee Levels Without Getting Up

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Necessity may be the mother of invention, but laziness is definitely its father. Case in point, here’s an interesting tidbit of imaging history: the first webcam ever was actually invented by lazy students at Cambridge University who didn’t want to waste a trip to the nearby coffee pot if it was going to be empty when they got there. Read more…

Photos of Modern Day Locations Blended with Shots of Major Historical Events

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In 2010, photographer Seth Taras created a series of photographs for a worldwide marketing campaign for the History Channel with the message “Know Where You Stand.” The photographer shot photos at locations around the world where major historical events happened, and then blended old photos showing those events from the same perspective. It’s the same “then and now” concept that has become quite popular over the past few years.
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‘Eyes of Hate’ Captured in Portrait of Nazi Politician by Jewish Photographer

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In September 1933, LIFE magazine photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt traveled to Geneva to document a meeting of the League of Nations. One of the political figures at the gathering was Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, one of Hitlers most devout underlings and a man who became known for his “homicidal anti-Semitism.”

Eisenstaedt was a German-born Jew. Not knowing this at first, Goebbels was initially friendly toward Eisenstaedt, who was able to capture a number of photos showing the Nazi politician in a good and cheerful mood (as in the photograph above).
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William Eggleston and the Validation of Color Photography as Legitimate Art

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William Eggleston didn’t invent color photography, but his landmark 1976 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art gave it dignity, and began the four-decade process of acceptance by curators and collectors as an art form to rival oil painting.

Shot in 1970, “Untitled (Memphis)” – shown above – was one of the 75 photos in the show, and also featured on the cover of the catalogue. Now it’s included in a retrospective of Eggleston’s early work at the Metropolitan.
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