Posts Tagged ‘history’

Why Didn’t People Smile in Old Photos?

portrait

Ever wonder why people in old paintings and photographs generally don’t have smiles on their faces? We explored this subject a little back in November 2012, and found that reasons may have included technical limitations, oral hygiene, and the seriousness of formal occasions.

Over at the Public Domain Review, Nicholas Jeeves has written up an in-depth piece on this subject that comes to some different conclusions.
Read more…

Victorian Era Detective Cameras and the Birth of Privacy Concerns

detectivecamerasongsheet

It’s more or less a given these days that cameras are everywhere and privacy is a quaint notion from the past. But it turns out that people were already starting to feel that way in the 1880s, when advancing technology allowed the production of cameras small and fast enough to be hidden by the user and produce shots of unprecedented candidness. Read more…

Lewis Hine’s Photography and The End of Child Labor in the United States

childlabor6

It’s hard to imagine it, but in the early 1900s, child labor was still extremely common in the United States. All across the nation children would spend their days slaving away in mines and cotton mills, far away from the school rooms that the National Child Labor Committee wanted them to be in.

The NCLC had been trying to put a stop to child labor since it was founded in 1904, but statistics weren’t having the effect they had hoped. So, in 1908, they decided to enlist the help of Lewis Hine and his camera to get their message out. Read more…

Color in Filmmaking: From the First Color Photograph to Digital Color Manipulation

Long before there was any way to capture colors on film, filmmakers were hand painting their short movies frame by frame to breathe life into black-and-white productions. The desire to capture color, it seems, far precedes our ability to do so.

In the Filmmaker IQ video above, John Hess takes you through a comprehensive history of color in filmmaking. From hand-tinting, to Technicolor, to digital color manipulation, take a look and see just how far we’ve come when it comes to capturing the reds, greens and blues of our world. Read more…

Amazing 19th Century Photographs of the American West by Timothy O’Sullivan

osullivan5

Photographer Timothy H. O’Sullivan is perhaps best known for his photos of the Civil War, which include his famous “Harvest of Death” photo. But after covering the war, O’Sullivan decided to strike out West, and when he came back, he brought with him some of the earliest photos of the (quite literally) “wild” American West. Read more…

Video: Educational Tutorial on the History, Physics and Uses of Cinema Lighting

Back in April, we shared the first of cinematographer Mark Vargo‘s informative series of videos on different photographic concepts. The videos are meant to educate photographers and videographers alike on these concepts so that they might “unleash their creative potential.”

The first video was on the types and uses of light meters, and now Vargo has finally released the second video in the series, dubbed “Let There Be Light.” Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

Read more…

Colorizing Photoshoppers Put a New Spin on Old Historical Photos

colorized

There’s an awesome little subreddit that has been getting a lot of press coverage as of late. It’s called ColorizedHistory, and is a 20,000+ person strong community of “Amateur Historians” who are interested in the idea of creating high quality colorized versions of historical black-and-white photographs.
Read more…

A Tour of Edinburgh Libraries’ Collection of Early Photography

If you have some time today, check out this video series by digital filmmaker and photographer Rich Ferguson, created for the Edinburgh Libraries in the capital of Scotland. It’s a brief tour through the collection of early Victorian photography held by the libraries.
Read more…

Faked World War I Dogfight Pictures Go On Auction Block

ScreenHunter_123 Aug. 13 11.03

They’re some of the most dramatic photographic documents of air combat in World War I, showing planes diving at each other, crashing in flames and pilots ejecting. And they’re all completely bogus.

That hasn’t stopped the work of Wesley David Archer from becoming famous and somewhat coveted, as attested by an upcoming Australian auction of his images.
Read more…

WWII Prisoners Built Improvised Cameras to Document Their Lives

prisoner

Ever since photography was invented in the 1800s, there have been people willing to risk life and limb to bring images to the public eye. Among the craziest examples are prisoners of war during World War II — people who built makeshift cameras out of smuggled parts in order to capture what life was like inside their prison camps.
Read more…