Posts Tagged ‘history’

Beautiful Poster Shows How We Got to the Cameras We Use Today

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If you’ve ever wanted a visual history of photographic cameras, this poster by Retrofuturismo-Kitsch, should suit your needs. Taking a look as far back as basic camera obscuras and all the way up to the Sony Mavica, this graphic pulls out some of the most iconic – and unusual – cameras to ever hit the market.

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American Museum of Natural History Starts Digitizing, Makes 7,000 Photos Available to the Public

American Museum of Natural History exterior at Manhattan Square, 1878

American Museum of Natural History exterior at Manhattan Square, 1878

In an effort to bring 145 years worth of its historic photography collection to the computer age, the American Museum of Natural History has digitized over 7,000 of its archived images and made them publicly available online. Read more…

Jürgen Schadeberg Talks Leica Cameras and South African Photojournalism

Put together by SixOranges, this four-minute video is an interview with renowned photographer Jürgen Schadeberg. In it, he shares the story behind the collection of Leica cameras he has used throughout his career, many of which were responsible for documenting some of the most iconic photographs of former South African President and icon Nelson Mandela throughout Madiba’s life. Read more…

A Look at The Unknown and Controversial Photography Career of Lewis Carroll

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Portrait of Charles Dodgson, aka: Lewis Carroll

He’s known as the author behind the famed Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland by most, but the breadth of his disciplines goes far beyond literature. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, more commonly known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was also a logician, mathematician, an ordained minister and a photographer… yes, a photographer.

In this article, we’ll share a collection of his work as we dive into his upbringing, his photography career and the controversy that surrounds it to this day. Read more…

Blast from the Past: Photography ‘Holiday Camp’ Video from 1961

This is pretty cool, and might just give you a good laugh at the same time. Go back in time and see what a photography ‘holiday camp’ (read: photography workshop) was like back in 1961, as what look to be a bunch of very amateur photographers try and learn to better compose and set up shots of beautiful women. Read more…

Amy Toensing Shares the Story Behind Her Photographs of the Oldest Culture On Earth

At an estimated 60,000 years old, the indigenous culture of Australia, the Aboriginals, are estimated to be the oldest still-surviving culture on the planet. And in the above video world-renown photographer Amy Toensing shares her experience photographing this incredibly unique culture for National Geographic, delivering an extremely heartfelt talk about the hardships the Aboriginal culture has continually faced since their land was colonized in 1788. Read more…

Nikon Poster Shows Sixty Years of Camera Evolution in One Image

Nikon Poster Featured

While planning to originally write up an article about an infographic sent to Nikon Rumors that showed every camera created by Nikon from 1948 to 2005, we came across an even more thorough collection of Nikon cameras in the form of a poster, created by none other than Nikon itself. Read more…

Cache of Undeveloped Film Discovered in an Attic, Shows Rare Perspective of WWI

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Britons are seeing a new side of the nation’s World War I experience thanks to the publication of a small treasure trove of negatives that were only recently discovered tucked away in someone’s attic. Read more…

My Photo Archiving Find Of A Lifetime

How I Found Hundreds Of Civil War And Old West Photos In An Attic In Vermont

Jan 14, 2014 · Terence Falk

Pioneering Photographer Robert Cornelius Credited With World’s First Selfie c. 1839

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Selfie, schmelfie! How self-absorbed do you really have to be to spend all of 20 seconds pointing a phone at yourself and tapping a few buttons? But a process that requires up to 15 minutes of statue-still posing, exposure to hazardous chemicals and construction of custom camera? Now that’s something worth bragging about.

So all hail pioneering American photographer Robert Cornelius, whose rough but certainly recognizable image, taken mere months after Louis Daugerre revealed his daguerrotype process in 1839, is undoubtedly the world’s first photographic self-portrait and may even be the first photographic portrait of any kind. Read more…