Posts Tagged ‘historical’

My Photo Archiving Find Of A Lifetime

How I Found Hundreds Of Civil War And Old West Photos In An Attic In Vermont

Jan 14, 2014 · Terence Falk

The Most Honored Photograph

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Doesn’t look like much, does it? But, depending upon your definition, this photograph, a team effort by 9 men, is the most honored picture in U. S. History. If you want to find out about it, read on. It’s an interesting tale about how people sometimes rise beyond all expectations.
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Does This Photo Show an Iconic Photo In the Making?

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Gizmodo writer Attila Nagy was browsing through the Boston Public Library’s Flickr stream recently when the above photograph by Leslie Jones caught his eye. He noticed that the scene in the background looked strangely similar to another, much more iconic, photo: “Night View, New York” by Berenice Abbott.

That got him wondering: could the figure seen in the foreground of the photograph actually be Berenice Abbott on the night she made her famous image?
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The First Photo

A personal mission to see where and how it happened.

Oct 02, 2013 · Harald Johnson

Why Didn’t People Smile in Old Photos?

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Ever wonder why people in old paintings and photographs generally don’t have smiles on their faces? We explored this subject a little back in November 2012, and found that reasons may have included technical limitations, oral hygiene, and the seriousness of formal occasions.

Over at the Public Domain Review, Nicholas Jeeves has written up an in-depth piece on this subject that comes to some different conclusions.
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Colorizing Photoshoppers Put a New Spin on Old Historical Photos

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There’s an awesome little subreddit that has been getting a lot of press coverage as of late. It’s called ColorizedHistory, and is a 20,000+ person strong community of “Amateur Historians” who are interested in the idea of creating high quality colorized versions of historical black-and-white photographs.
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A Tour of Edinburgh Libraries’ Collection of Early Photography

If you have some time today, check out this video series by digital filmmaker and photographer Rich Ferguson, created for the Edinburgh Libraries in the capital of Scotland. It’s a brief tour through the collection of early Victorian photography held by the libraries.
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Then-and-Now Photos of New York City

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NYC Grid is a website run by Paul Sahner that explores and documents New York neighborhoods, “street by street and block by block.” One of the awesome reoccurring features on the blog is the before-and-after section, which features pairs of photos showing identical locations but shot decades — or sometimes over a century — apart.
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Carl Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33: The Fastest Lens Ever Made?

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If you thought the Zeiss f/0.7 lenses we shared yesterday were impressive, check out this crazy piece of glass: it’s the Carl Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33. It’s what some people call the fastest camera lens ever made.

Is that claim true? Well, yes and no… but mostly no.
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WWII Prisoners Built Improvised Cameras to Document Their Lives

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Ever since photography was invented in the 1800s, there have been people willing to risk life and limb to bring images to the public eye. Among the craziest examples are prisoners of war during World War II — people who built makeshift cameras out of smuggled parts in order to capture what life was like inside their prison camps.
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