Posts Tagged ‘highspeed’

High-Speed Photos of Cameras Exploding

Last year we featured a CGI rendering of an exploding Polaroid One Step camera that makes for a nice wallpaper. Photographer Alan Sailer creates real photographs showing the same thing. Sailer drills a hole into each camera, fills the void with a firecracker, and then captures the resulting explosion with high-speed photography using a Nikon D90.
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Shooting High-Speed Water Drop Photos From Start to Finish

Over the past couple of years, German photographer Markus Reugels has attracted quite a bit of attention for his high-speed photographs of water drop splashes. His project, titled “Liquid Splashes”, consists of split-second photos that make colorful splashes look like tiny glass sculptures hovering in the air above a mirror. In the video above, Reugels introduces himself and his work, and takes us on a behind-the-scenes tour showing how he goes about creating his beautiful photographs.
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BTS: How National Geographic Captured a Cheetah Running at Full Speed

Back in June, a National Geographic crew was given the task of filming and photographing a cheetah running at full speed. While there are plenty of videos and photos out there showing this, the magazine wanted to track alongside the cheetah as it ran (rather than simply capture it from a fixed location). The short behind-the-scenes video above shows how they went about doing this.
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SigZilla to be Used at the World Series on a Specially Modified Phantom Camera

You know that beastly Sigma 200-500mm that we’ve featured twice in the past two days? Turns out it’s headed to the World Series to be used for some pretty ground-breaking imagery. A post today by Jakob Schiller over at Wired fills in some interesting details on what the lens will be used for.
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Beautiful Slow-Mo Using $300K Worth of Camera Gear on a Hot Summer Day

What would you capture if you had a day off on a hot summer day with $300,000 worth of camera gear lying around the house? That was the happy situation filmmaker Brad Kremer found himself in recently. The gear he found himself with at the time included an uber-expensive Phantom Flex high-speed camera, Zeiss super speed glass, a Canon 5D Mark III DSLR, and Canon L glass. He decided to put the gear to use (and flex his creative muscles) by inviting the neighborhood children over for a water balloon party — the perfect recipe for epic slow-motion footage.

As summer comes to an end and Autumn begins, kids go back to school and dream of warm days filled with laughter and joy. This short film is a reflection of that dream. Shot with a Phantom Flex it captures the magic of the moment. With frame rates of up to 2564 fps at 1080p we see every detail, every smile and every sparkle in the kids eyes. And that is where the magic lies. Within the hopes and dreams of our children.

He titled the resulting short film (shown above) A Phantom Flex Summer Story. It does not disappoint.

(via John Nack)


P.S. In case you’re wondering, the song in the background is “Moonchild” by the band M83.

Awesome Photos of Bald Men Wearing Water Splashes as Wigs

Los Angeles-based photographer Tim Tadder, whose humorous Fish Head project we recently featured, is back again with another creative photo project based around experiments with water. This time, he found a bunch of bald guys, hurled water balloons at their heads, and then used a laser and sound trigger to capture high speed photographs. The resulting series, titled Water Wigs, shows the models wearing evanescent wigs created entirely of water.
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Super Slow Motion Bullet Footage Using a Car As the Projectile

You know those amazing high speed photos and videos of bullets being shot through various objects? BMW Canada decided to take things a step further and use a car instead of a bullet. They drove a car at top speed across salt flats and had it smash through a giant glass apple, some giant water balloons, and a target. The resulting slow motion footage is quite amazing.

Amazing Slow Motion Footage Using a High Speed Camera Robot

Super slow motion footage captured by high speed cameras usually shows slow movements (if any), but German studio The Marmalade came up with a brilliant way of speeding up the movements: a high-speed robot camera operator.

Our groundbreaking High Speed Motion Control System ‘Spike’ brings the creative freedom of a moving camera to the world of high speed filming and so enables us to create shots that would be impossible to achieve otherwise. ‘Spike’ can freely move the camera with unparalleled speed and precision, thereby removing the previously existing creative limitation of having to shoot high speed sequences with a locked camera.

By marrying the hardware of a sturdy and reliable industrial robot to software that was built from the ground up for the demands of motion controlled high speed imaging, we developed a unique system for creating real life camera moves with the ease of use normally associated with 3D Animation.

The system does camera moves that are exactly repeatable, allowing them to be slightly tweaked until the shot is just right.
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Incredible Flowers Created with Splashes and High Speed Photography

Photographer Jack Long has an absolutely amazing series of photographs titled Vessels and Blooms that features liquid flowers captured by shooting high speed photographs of splashes. The images are not faked with Photoshop, but are instead single exposures that result from months of planning and testing.
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First Slow-Motion Phantom Miro M120 Video Doesn’t Disappoint

Cinematographer Jim Geduldick was lucky enough to be the first to test out Vision Research’s new Phantom Miro M120 high-speed camera in the real world, and — luckily for the rest of us — is kind enough to share the results. Falling on the smaller, more rugged side of the Phantom line, the M120 is made to take, well, exactly the kind of footage Geduldick captured. The camera can shoot a whopping 1540 at full 1080p HD, and is estimated to cost anywhere from $25,000 to $60,000 — a bargain compared to the price tags on its more expensive siblings.

(via Gizmodo)