Posts Tagged ‘highres’

Lightroom 4 Update Brings Compatibility for Retina Displays, iPhone Lens Profiles

Earlier today, Adobe officially launched Lightroom 4.3 and Camera Raw 7.3, an update that brings support for Apple Retina Displays (and other HiDPI high-res screens) to Lightroom. The news comes just a couple of days after Photoshop received its own HiDPI compatibility update.
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Rumor: Sony High-Megapixel Full-Frame DSLR Being Tested in the Wild

Canon isn’t the only one that’s reportedly testing multiple high-megapixel full-frame camera prototypes: Sony is as well. Rumors that Sony will soon be joining the high-megapixel DSLR/SLT war are heating up. sonyalpharumors writes that prototypes are already in photographers’ hands:

[I have now] heard about three different Sony Full Frame prototype cameras. And I mean really completely different! Not three version of the same concept. I am still working on the details of these cameras but I can anticipate that one of these is the High End A1x (not the definitive name) High Megapixel camera. That is due for a 2013 release. And photographers are already testing it on the field!

The latest rumor back in October was that there were at least two models: a 36MP one and a 50MP one. The 36MP variant may be the same Sony sensor found inside the Nikon D800 — a sensor that received the highest score ever handed out by DxOMark. Sony sensors have been very highly regarded as of late, so the company should be a serious contender in the high-megapixel war — at least based on image quality.

Dropbox iOS App Now Downloads Full-Resolution Photos from the Cloud

If you’ve been using Dropbox as a photo backup solution and the official iOS app for accessing your images in the cloud, you may have noticed that downloading photos to your device didn’t give you the exact files that you wanted. Instead of beaming the full-resolution images to your Camera Roll, the app would shrink photos to a much smaller size to speed up downloading times. A 14MP 4592×3056 photo would only be saved at 960×638, for example.

This week, Dropbox finally updated the app and removed the resolution ceiling from downloads. Now you can save your entire photos from your backup to your iOS device without seeing it pass under a shrink ray.
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Upcoming Sony Full-Frame Camera May Boast a 50-Megapixel Sensor

It has only been a month since Sony announced its latest flagship full-frame camera, the A99, but rumors are already beginning to emerge regarding the company’s next top-of-the-line offering. sonyalpharumors writes that Sony has reportedly marked sometime between May and June 2013 as a tentative release date for its next high-end full-frame:

The camera will be more “photographer” oriented. There are currently a couple of different prototypes. One we heard of has a 36 Megapixel sensor (same as Nikon D800) and built-in vertical grip. Priced well above the current Sony A99. A second prototype has a new 50 Megapixel sensor which goal is to go as close as possible to a “medium format” quality.

The new camera wouldn’t be intended to replace the A99, but would instead become the flag-bearer by creating an entirely new tier in the Sony lineup. If the latest rumors pan out, then 50 megapixels may soon become the new standard resolution for flagship DSLRs; Canon is reportedly working on its own high-res (46MP) camera.


Update: Reader Scott Hutchison reminds us that back in May, there was a rumor that working on a “A1S” camera with a full-frame 36x36mm square sensor. Hmm…

Will High-Resolution Displays Convert Smartphone Shooters Back to Cameras?

Smartphone cameras have gotten to the point of being able to stack up well against digital cameras — at least when viewing the photos at smaller sizes. Zoom in, and there’s still a pretty big gap in quality due to the smartphone’s smaller lens and sensor. BuzzFeed’s John Herrman writes that the emergence of ultra-high res displays displays is converting people back to digital cameras:

Sometime in the last year, I gave up on carrying a camera. My phone is compact, quick, has the ability to share photos directly, and, at least to my eye, produces photos that are nearly comparable to my $700 interchangeable lens camera. In most contexts, I stand by that — on Facebook, in iPhoto, or on Instagram, my iPhone photos look fine. Great, even.

But one thing I noticed when I first used a Retina iPad, which automatically pulled in my old iPhone shots from the cloud, was that these “good enough” photos looked awful. Grainy, blotchy, and even kind of blurry. Evidently the new Retina MacBook has the same effect. Marco Arment, creator of Instapaper, says it’s driving him back to his DSLR.

Maybe It’s Time To Carry A Real Camera Again (via Gizmodo)


Image credit: Retina Display by LJR.MIKE