Posts Tagged ‘highend’

The G7 X is Canon’s First 1-inch-Sensor Compact, Competes with the Best High-End Point-and-Shoots

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The 7D Mark II might have been the big fat headliner of Canon’s Photokina announcements, but it certainly wasn’t the only newsworthy camera the company debuted. Joining the Mark II is the GX 7: Canon’s very first compact with a 1-inch sensor. Read more…

Eizo Announces Two AdobeRGB Monitors Built with Photographers in Mind

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Looking to make the lives of photographers across the globe a little bit easier, high-end Japanese display company Eizo Corp has unveiled two new ColorEdge-series monitors that are sure to raise a few eyebrows. Read more…

Leaked Photos of Olympus’ Next High-End Compact, the XZ-10

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Here’s a sneak peek at Olympus’ upcoming high-end compact camera, the XZ-10. It will likely succeed or be sold alongside the Olympus XZ-2, which features a 1/1.7-inch sensor and competes directly against the semi-large-sensor compacts of other manufacturers (e.g. Nikon P7700, Canon G15).
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MagFilter Uses Magnets to Give High-End Compacts Some Filter Love

Compact cameras are becoming pretty serious photography tools when it comes to sensor sizes and lens qualities, but one thing they generally lack is an easy-to-use filter system. Interchangeable-lens photographers can usually just find a filter of the correct diameter and use it with their lens, but things get more complicated when you’re dealing with fixed-lens cameras. Although using filters is possible with some models, the systems aren’t very friendly: they’re usually proprietary, expensive, or based on unwieldy adapters.

That all changes with the new MagFilter by CarrySpeed, an easy-to-use filter system for compact cameras based on magnets rather than threads.
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Sigma Creates Special Wood Version of the SD1, Will Only Make 10 of Them

Want a wooden DSLR? If you have extremely deep pockets, nows your chance: Sigma has announced a special wood edition of its high-end SD1 DSLR, which ordinarily sells for $9,700. dpreview writes,

The ‘Wood Edition’ emphasizes the camera’s premium appeal by adding a casing made from Amboyna Burl, an expensive and decorative veneer taken from complex growths on a Southeast Asian tree. The case takes around 60 hours to cut, mill and polish.

Only ten of these cameras will be made, with each one priced at €9,999 (~$13,800).

Canon Announces the S100 with CMOS Sensor and DIGIC 5

Today Canon unveiled its new high-end PowerShot S100 compact camera, successor to the popular S95. The S100 uses Canon’s new DIGIC 5 image processor and packs a CMOS sensor (1/1.7″) instead a CCD one. It shoots 12 megapixel images with a 24-120mm (35mm equivalent) f/2.0 lens, can capture RAW files, has a max ISO of 6400, includes GPS functionality, and has a 3-inch LCD screen. The camera is very similar to Canon’s high-end G series (the sensor size is the same), except the S series has a smaller body and leaves out an optical viewfinder. It’ll hit store shelves in early November at a price of $430.

Nikon Packs a Whole Lot into the P300 but Leaves Out RAW

Nikon announced the high-end compact P300 today to compete against the likes of Canon’s popular S95 and Olympus’ XZ-1. First, the good things — the 12 megapixel camera has a sweet f/1.8 24-100mm equivalent lens that should perform quite nicely in low light situations (especially with an ISO that can be boosted up to 3200). It can also record HD video at 1080p and 30fps, and has a 3-inch LCD that’s easy on the eyes.

On the flip side, Nikon decided for some reason to leave RAW shooting out, making this an extremely expensive, high-quality JPEG shooter, something that isn’t going to satisfy more serious photographers who want a smaller compact that still allows serious post-production work. You can find some comparison tables showing this camera stacked up against competition over on CNET and on Nikon Rumors. It’ll be available in March 2011 for $330.