Posts Tagged ‘highdynamicrange’

Video: How to Effectively Capture Realistic-Looking HDR Images

There are many of us who sigh at hearing the dreaded acronym, HDR. Oftentimes we associate it with oversaturated, cartoon-like compositions put together from half a dozen worth of frames. But that’s not the only way to approach HDR. As with everything, it’s a variable, not definitive.

In the above video, Washington DC-based photographer Tim Cooper shows off how to effectively capture an HDR image. And he does so in such a manner that it replicates what the human eye sees, without over-processing as we all too often see.

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HDR Explained in Quick, Informative Video

Obviously this video and post isn’t for the advanced HDR photographer, but even if you have a good understanding of what High Dynamic Range is or how to capture it, you’ll probably find one or two tidbits of very interesting information in this short video by Techquickie. Read more…

Brinno Announces the World’s First HDR Time-Lapse Video Camera

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When it comes to creating quality time-lapse videos, many photographers relish having a serious amount of control over their result. But if you’re the kind of person who isn’t into intervalometers or messing with rail systems, and you’re looking for something that’s more of a “set it and forget it” system, Brinno’s new TLC200 Pro may fit the bill just right. Read more…

Rambus’ ‘Binary Pixel’ Technology Seeks to Bring Single-Shot HDR to Smartphones

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Tech company Rambus just announced “Binary Pixels,” a new sensor technology that intends to bring ultra-high dynamic range to small sensors like those found in smartphones and P&S cameras. By allowing pixels to “reset” and saturate more than once, the pixel tech promises to expand the dynamic range of these sensors to “single-shot HDR” levels. Read more…

Apple Patents Method of Generating HDR Photos from Single Exposures

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High dynamic range (HDR) mode is becoming a standard feature in newer digital cameras and smartphones. By snapping multiple photographs at different exposure levels, the camera can automatically generate an image that captures a greater range of light and dark areas than a standard photograph. However, the technique does have its weaknesses. Artifacts appear if any changes occur in the scene between the different shots, which limits the scenarios in which the technique can be used.

Apple wants to overcome this issue by implementing an HDR mode that only requires a single exposure. A recently published patent shows that Apple is well on its way to doing so.
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Wearable Cameras May One Day Give Us Ultra-HDR Vision

When doing certain types of welding, special helmets with dark lens shades should be used to protect the eyes from the extremely bright welding arc and sparks. The masks help filter out light, protecting your eyes, but at the same time make it hard to see the details in what you’re doing. In other words, the dynamic range is too high, and wearers are unable to see both the arc and the objects they’re welding.

A group of researchers in the EyeTap Personal Imaging Lab at the University of Toronto have a solution, and it involves cameras. They’ve created a “quantigraphic camera” that can give people enhanced vision. Instead of being tuned to one particular brightness, it attempts to make everything in front of the wearer visible by using ultra high dynamic range imaging.
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Is HDR Acceptable in Photojournalism?

The Washington Post raised some eyebrows last Friday after running an uber-saturated front page photo with the caption stating that it was “a composite created by taking several photos and combining them with computer software to transcend the visual limitations of standard photography.” After emailing the photo editor, Poynter learned that the image was simply an HDR photograph. While it’s a pretty common technique these days, some believe that it has no place in photojournalism,

Sean Elliot, president of the National Press Photographers Association, said, “HDR is not appropriate for documentary photojournalism.” The organization’s code of ethics say photographers should respect the integrity of the digital moment, “and in that light an HDR photo is no different from any other digital manipulation.”

“By using HDR,” he told me by email, “The Washington Post has combined different moments, and thereby created an image that does not exist. The aircraft visible in the final product was not there for all the other moments combined into the final, and that alone simply raises too many questions about the factual validity of the actual published image.” [#]

What complicates matters is that many new cameras (e.g. Nikon D4, Apple iPhone 4S) offer HDR features that create single images from multiple exposures in the camera. The Washington Post published a response to the controversy yesterday. Do you think HDR is an appropriate technique for photojournalists to use?

(via The Washington Post via Poynter)


Image credits: Screenshot from The Washington Post, and photograph by Bill O’Leary

AMP Camera Captures HDR Video in Real Time with One Lens and Three Sensors

Late last year we showed you an interesting demonstration of HDR video filmed using two Canon 5D Mark IIs. The cameras captured the exact same scene at different exposure values using a beam-splitter. Now, a new camera called AMP has been developed that captures real-time HDR video using a single lens. The trick is that there are two beam-splitters in the camera that take the light and direct it onto three different sensors, giving the system a dynamic range of 17 stops. Check out some sample clips in the video above — they might be pretty ugly, but the technology here is pretty interesting.
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HDR Photo of Endeavour Liftoff by NASA

Here’s a good example of when HDR photography is useful: NASA created this image of the Space Shuttle Endeavour lifting off for the final time by combining six separate photographs.

Each image was taken at a different exposure setting, then composited to balance the brightness of the rocket engine output with the regular daylight levels at which the orbiter can be seen. The processing software digitally removes pure black or pure white pixels from one image and replaces them with the most detailed pixel option from the five other images. This technique can help visualize debris falling during a launch or support research involving intense light sources like rocket engines, plasma experiments and hypersonic vehicle engines. [#]

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Beautiful HDR Time-lapse of Las Vegas

Here’s a beautiful tone mapped HDR time-lapse video of Las Vegas shot by Philip Bloom using a few Canon DSLRs and a Panasonic GH2. He spent 5 days shooting, and many more processing the bracketed photographs using Photomatix Pro. It’s pretty amazing seeing Las Vegas go from day to night and then back again — all in HDR. To find out how Bloom did this, check out the behind-the-scenes writeup and video over on his blog.