Posts Tagged ‘helicopter’

Lighting a Wakeboarder Using a Battery-Powered, Helicopter-Mounted Strobe

Photographer Bryan Soderlind recently did a photo shoot with his buddy, professional wakeboarder Rusty Malinoski (the first person to ever land a 1080 in competition). Instead of the usual setup photographers use for wakeboarding photography, the two decided to try something crazier: lighting the action from the air using a battery-powered strobe placed in a helicopter.
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New York Magazine Cover Features Photo of a Blacked-Out New York City

Everyone seems to be talking about the cover photo of this week’s issue of New York Magazine. It shows NYC blacked out after Hurricane Sandy, and was captured last Wednesday by Dutch photographer Iwan Baan from the open door of a helicopter 5,000 feet above the ground. Poynter has published an interesting behind-the-scenes look at how it was shot:

Baan made the image Wednesday night after the storm, using the new Canon 1D X with the new 24-70mm lens on full open aperture. The camera was set at 25,000 ISO, with a 1/40th of a second shutter speed [...]

It was more difficult to rent a car than a helicopter in New York the day after Sandy, Baan said. And because there was such limited air traffic so soon after the storm, air traffic control allowed Baan and the helicopter to hover very high above the city, a powerful advantage for the photo.

NY Mag editors say that picking the cover photo was the easiest choice they had to make this past week. They’ve also published a slideshow featuring 10 aerial photographs Baan captured that night.

Architecture photographer explains how he got that New York magazine cover shot [Poynter]


Image credit: Photograph by Iwan Baan/New York Magazine

Camera Synchronized to Chopper Blades Creates Amazing Illusion

Here’s an old-ish video that’s been making the rounds again lately (viral videos are like viruses — they don’t go away very easily). Titled “Camera shutter speed synchronized with helicopter blade frequency,” it shows what can happen when your camera is synchronized with the RPM of a helicopter’s rotor blades. The resulting footage makes the helicopter look as though it’s just floating in the air!
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Camera-Equipped Copter Beams FPV to Goggles for Beautiful Aerial Imagery

We’re getting to the point at which photographers can buy fancy aerial drones without having to sell a kidney. You’ve probably already seen photos and videos shot from camera-equipped radio-controlled helicopters before, but did you know that the camera’s view can be beamed to a pair of goggles, allowing the photographer to be immersed in a first-person-view of what he or she is shooting?
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Light Painting Photos Shot Using an RC Helicopter

Destin of Smarter Every Day recently shot some light-painting photographs using an RC helicopter loaded with colored lights. The maneuverability of the helicopter turns the great outdoors into a giant canvas on which you can light paint giant 3D shapes.
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Beautiful Photographs of Patterns Seen from a Helicopter

Aerial photographer Stephan Zirwes shoots amazing images of patterns and repetition seen in landscapes while looking straight down from a helicopter. From his perspective, things like cars, shipping containers, and people blend together into abstract designs.
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360-Degree Video: A Beautiful Helicopter Ride Through Scenic Landscapes

Check out this incredible 360-degree video by northStudio360, titled “The Nimmo Bay Experience”. They attached the camera(s) to the bottom of a helicopter, and flew through some incredibly beautiful landscapes. Simply click and drag to move the camera’s direction.
Video after the break

Crazy Rolling Shutter World Captured by Camera Attached to Helicopter Rotor

You’ve probably seen videos showing the rolling shutter effect turning airplane propellers into boomerangs, but what if the camera was attached to the spinning object rather than pointed at it? mguw of Helidigital decided to find out by attaching a small camera to the rotorhead of an RC helicopter, synchronizing the RPM of the rotor to the scan rate of the camera. The result is an uber-trippy video in which reality is bended through the rolling shutter effect.