Posts Tagged ‘hdvideo’

Pyle Audio Announces a GoPro-like Action Cam for Under $100

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If you like the idea of having a GoPro or other action cam to capture all of your daredevil stunts but don’t readily have several hundred to drop on one, the company Pyle Audio just debuted something you might be interested in. Read more…

Magic Lantern Manages to Pull 24p RAW Video Out of the Canon 5D Mk III

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A couple of weeks ago, the Magic Lantern team announced that they had discovered a RAW DNG Live View output on the 5D Mark II and Mark III. At the time, they could only get 14 frames per second for only 28 frames before the camera needed to buffer, but the team was confident that they could eventually increase the speed to 24p and pull a true RAW video feed out of the camera.

Lo and behold, that’s exactly what they’ve done. According to user lourenco in the Magic Lantern forums, he’s tested the new capability and he can pull continuous 1920×850 RAW video at 24p. Read more…

Inpainting Software Removes People and Objects from HD Video

Some pretty amazing new software developed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics is bringing something akin to cloning to the world of HD video. Using a step-by-step process, the software removes moving people or objects from video and then fills in the empty space with data from other frames. Read more…

5K Footage Created by Shooting with the Canon 1D X at 14FPS

Canon’s new flagship DSLR, the 1D X, can shoot 18.1 megapixel JPEG photographs at a staggering 14 frames per second in burst mode. This is nearly at the 16 frames per second needed to hide jerkiness from the human eye — the flicker fusion threshold for moving images. Though the frame rate falls short of the 24fps used for Hollywood movies and by many video cameras, 18.1 megapixels per frame translates to 5K resolution in video lingo, while the video feature of the 1D X only shoots at 1080p (~2 megapixels per frame).

Gizmodo’s Michael Hession realized that the camera’s burst mode could still be used to produce reasonably smooth video. The clip above shows Hession’s experiments with using the 1D X as a relatively cheap 5K video camera. 2,000 separate JPEG stills went into creating the two-minute-long video.
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Creating Still Photographs by Extracting Frames from HD Video

Are we close to the point at which HD video cameras are so good that professional photographs can simply be extracted from footage rather than shot with a still photography camera? That’s a question photographer Kevin Arnold had, and when he finally got his hands on a $65,000 RED camera he decided to seek an answer:

What I hadn’t anticipated going into this was the advantages this style of shooting would offer in terms of capturing natural expressions and key moments. Obviously, when you’re shooting 120 frames-per-second, it’s almost impossible to miss a moment. But there’s more to it. Shooting video is comparably silent and, without the constant clicking of the shutter reminding them that their every movement was being recorded, the athletes were able to forget I was there. This is huge when you’re striving for authentic, candid images, a hallmark of my work.

On the flip side, Arnold found that one of the biggest issues was achieving fast enough shutter speeds for sharp frames, as most of the frames in his videos were plagued with some kind of blur. Head on over to his blog to read his in depth exploration.

Stills, Meet Motion (via A Photo Editor)


Image credit: Photographs by Kevin Arnold

HD Video Explained: Why 720p is Better than 1080i

High definition video recording is a standard feature on digital cameras these days. If you’ve never really understood the terms 1080p, 1080i, and 720p, here’s a short and sweet explanation that’ll bring you up to speed. Benjamin Higginbotham of Technology Evangelist describes the differences between varieties and why you can consider 720p “better” than 1080i.

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Capture HD Video with Depth Using a DSLR and Microsoft Kinect

RGBDToolkit is a project that layers HD video recording with a DSLR over Microsoft Kinect’s depth maps, creating trippy 3D footage that may be an indication of what we’ll be documenting life with in the future.
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iPhone 4S vs Canon 5D Mark II: A Side-by-Side Comparison of 1080p HD Video

Here’s a test comparing the 1080p HD video recording capabilities of the iPhone 4S and the Canon 5D Mark II. Vimeo user Robino Films shot the same scenes at the same time with both cameras using a special rig, and then synched the footage together. They also tried to match the exposure, shutter speed, frame rate, and picture style as much as possible.

Sony Brings Single Lens 3D and 1080/60p Video to Compact Cameras

The big camera corps are dumping a huge number of new compact cameras at CES 2011. While many are standard upgrades to bring their cameras up to par with what consumers expect nowadays, there are some that stand out for one reason or another. Some of Sony’s new compact cameras (the DSC-TX100V, DSC-TX10, DSC-HX7V, DSC-WX10 and DSC-WX9) are unique in that they can shoot 3D photographs with a single lens and sensor. The trick is that two separate photographs with different focus settings are captured and combined to produce a 3D look. The DSC-WX10 (shown above) is also the world’s first compact camera capable of 1080/60p video recording. These cameras will be available for between $220 and $380 starting in March 2011.

GoPro Goes Entry Level with the Cheaper HD Hero 960

We’ve seen GoPro cameras in quite a few stories as of late, with people using them for things ranging from making friends with Great White sharks to capturing amazing home videos of space. Good news if you’ve been thinking of getting one for action footage — they’ve just released the cheaper HD Hero 960. You get 960p instead of 1080p, and you lose an expansion port for external displays and batteries, but you pay $180 instead of the $300 it costs for an HD Hero.

HD HERO 960 Camera (via Engadget)