Posts Tagged ‘haunting’

The Haunting Long Exposure Photography of Darren Moore

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Long exposure photography like UK photographer Darren Moore‘s is the polar opposite of the super fast, super sensitive in low light kind of photography that gets most of the attention these days. It’s time-consuming and difficult, but the unearthly quality of the images that Moore produces make dealing with those challenges well worth it. Read more…

Photographer Brings the Landscapes of the Brothers Grimm to Life in Haunting Photos

Allee Niederbayern

People familiar with the Brother’s Grimm fairy tales know that the Disney versions of many of these tales were rather less dark than the original, broody, oh-my-goodness-did-that-just-happen-in-a-fiary-tale versions.

The photographs in German photographer Kilian Schoenberger‘s series Brothers Grimm’s Homeland represent the latter universe: a foggy, dark, ominous place where the next footfall you hear might send you running. Read more…

A Kind of You: Disturbing Portraits of Street Performing Monkeys in Jakarta

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There are only a few words that adequately describe photographer Perttu Saksa‘s series A Kind of You. Many news outlets chose “haunting” and we decided to go with “disturbing,” but we could have just as easily have characterized them as “gripping.”

Because that’s what these portraits do, they grab on to you and force you face-to-face with a kind of animal cruelty you might not otherwise have known existed. Read more…

Interview: Susan Dobson, The Artist Behind the Haunting Series ‘Sense of an Ending’

Susan Dobson is best known for her work on suburban culture, architecture, and landscape. Her photographs have been exhibited across Canada, as well as in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, China, Germany, Spain, and Mexico. Her work was included in the Canadian Biennial titled Builders at the National Gallery of Canada in 2012, and she was a contributing artist to the Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad. Dobson is Associate Professor at the University of Guelph.

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Susan Dobson’s series “Sense of an Ending” gives us look at architecture, decay and a literal sense of ending — reminding us that eventually everything around us will become rubble. Through the use of composite imagery, Dobson crafts scenes frozen in melancholy.

As the overcast skies in each piece forebode cold and rain, and as the architectural styles have begun to weather and collapse, these images, while fiction, portray the inevitable truth of not just homes and buildings, but perhaps cities and civilizations as well. Read more…

The Would-Be Assassin and the Camera

Analyzing the hauntingly-modern portrait of Lincoln assassination co-conspirator Lewis Powell

Michael Sacasas · Oct 25, 2013 · 37 Comments » ·

War Photographer Don McCullin Reflects on a Career of Chasing Haunting Images

Here’s a powerful video shared by The Economist a couple of years ago that features acclaimed British photojournalist Don McCullin talking about his 50 years of photographing war, atrocities, and human suffering. (Warning: it contains disturbing images.)
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Haunting Portraits of the Homeless

Photographer Lee Jeffries worked as a sports photographer before having a chance encounter one day with a young homeless girl on a London street. After stealthily photographing the girl huddled in her sleeping bag, Jeffries decided to approach and talk with her rather than disappear with the photograph. That day changed his perception about the homeless, and he then decided to make them the subject of his photography. Jeffries makes portraits of homeless people he meets in Europe and in the US, and makes it a point to get to know them before asking to create the portraits. His photographs are gritty, honest, and haunting.
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Portraits of Soldiers Before, During, and After War

For her project titled Marked, photographer Claire Felicie shot close-up portraits of the marines in the 13th infantry company of the Royal Netherlands Marine Corps before, during, and after their deployment from 2009-2010. She then arranged the portraits into haunting triptychs that show the toll war has on a person’s eyes and face.
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