Posts Tagged ‘hardwork’

Good Enough to Succeed in Photography

goodenough

It’s been a tough few years and people are frustrated with the state of the industry. Everywhere I turn, people seem to be saying that a photography career isn’t what it used to be and that budgets are tight. Many of the blogs I read and the message boards that I visit all seem to be repeating the same message: There’s no work, there’s no money, and the competition is too intense to succeed. To quote one frustrated photographer, “How do you f’ing make a living shooting pictures anymore?Read more…

The Science of Meaning and How to Stay Motivated in Our Work

At TEDx Rio de la Plata, author Dan Ariely gave an interesting talk on motivation and how to feel good about our work. Challenging the conventional belief that money equals motivation, he shows how injecting meaning into our work — be that by making the work itself harder or having others acknowledge it — has a huge impact on why and how we stay motivated.

The video doesn’t specifically mention photography, but the lessons still apply. Without meaning, motivation dies; and the ways we get meaning are either by having others acknowledge/use our photography or by challenging ourselves to push the limits of our skill. Read more…

Photographer Capturing the 40th Parallel All Across the United States

Want to see an example of what dedication to a photography project looks like? Check out The Fortieth Parallel, an ongoing series by Cambridge, Massachusetts-based photographer Bruce Myren. It’s a set of photographs captured across the 40th degree of latitude across the United States, at every whole degree of longitude. See those markers on the Google Map above? Those are all the photo spots that Myren aims to photograph.
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Lyric-Lapse Music Video That Required 6 Hours of Work for Every 3 Seconds

Dream Music: Part 2 is an amazing stop-motion and time-lapse video by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams that features a technique they call “lyric-lapsing”. Using still photos, they somehow planned the time-lapse sequences just right, so that the singer in the video is actually mouthing the words as he scurries around to various locations. They state that the video is a “musical voyage into the depths of the subconscious”, and that it was designed to “transport the viewer from their own reality into a world of dreams and at the end, [...] awake to wonder how we were able to take them there.”

The magnitude of the effort is what’s truly impressive. The creators spent six months shooting the photos across two states. Every 3-4 seconds seen in the video required about 6-8 hours of work to create.
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A Stop Motion Love Story Created Using 3000+ Hand-Cut Photographs

Computer generated imagery is becoming ubiquitous in the world of filmmaking, but some people still prefer some good ol’ fashioned elbow grease. Los Angeles-based filmmaker Vu Hoang of Westscape Media spent 7 months creating this stop-motion love story, titled “Love Drama”. Why did it take so long? Well, Hoang and his small crew of 3 people created all the animation seen using 3,000 photographs — photos that were shot frame by frame and individually cut out by hand.
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Time-Lapse of a Man Sorting 65,000 LEGO Blocks Over 71 Hours

Stop-motion projects often require mind-blowing amounts of work and preparation. Just how mind-blowing? Music duo Daniel Larsson and Tomas Redigh (AKA Rymdreglage) recently poured out 100 boxes of LEGO pieces that each contained 650 blocks. They then had two cameras snap a photo every 20 seconds as they spent a whopping 71 hours sorting by color. The time-lapse video was created using the 12,775 photos that each memory card ended up with.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Amazing Stop-Motion Music Video Made Using 920 Colored Pencils

Here’s another cool example of what’s possible when you combine creativity with an insane amount of dedication: animator Jonathan Chong spent hundreds of hours creating this stop motion video for the song “Against The Grain” by the Australian band Hudson. He animated everything by hand, and captured 5125 individual photographs of 920 pencils for the three-minute long finished product.
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Stop-Motion Music Video Shot Over Two Years with 288,000 Jelly Beans

Want to see what pure dedication looks like? This music video for the song “In Your Arms” by Kina Grannis is a stop-motion animation done with a background composed of jelly beans. It’s a crazy project that required 22 months, 1,357 hours, 30 people, and 288,000 jelly beans. They could have used CGI, of course, but each frame was carefully created by hand and photographed with a still camera. It’s even more mind-blowing given this fact: none of it was done with a green screen.
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Music Video Created with 3,233 Printed Photos Over Half a Year

Australian college student Nathan Grant created this stop-motion music video for the song ‘Minister’s Daughter’ by the band The Good God Damned. After recording footage of the band playing using a Sony XDCAM, Grant printed out 3,433 photographs from stills in the video. He then spent six months turning the prints into this stop-motion video, capturing the new photographs with a Canon 600D.

Creative Stop-Motion Music Video Using a Boatload of Prints

Photographer Nathan Seabrook made this creative stop-motion music video for the band Yuba Diamond. Despite what your eyes might tell you to believe, no computer trickery was used. Instead, Seabrook used roughly 1700 separate prints and some old fashioned techniques (e.g. fishing line and projecting scenes onto the background) for all the animations and effects seen in the video.