Posts Tagged ‘green’

Surprisingly Colorful Photos Reveal a Side of Antarctica You’ve Probably Never Seen

Penguin Beach

When you hear Antarctica, a number of images probably come to mind: penguins waddling along, barren white expanses and massive glaciers all probably make an appearance. But no matter what images the continent conjures up, you probably wouldn’t describe any of them as ‘colorful.’

When Canadian photographer Gaston Lacombe headed south to spend a couple of months on the frigid continent, he too expected to find a whole lot of white, with maybe some blue and the occasional tuxedo black of a penguin. What he didn’t expect were the occasional explosions of color he actually found there. Read more…

From Bottles to Wall Art: Adorn Your Walls with Prints Made from Recycled Bottles

stretcher

Photography is one of the most powerful ways that ecological messages are transmitted. Photo series of landfills show us the issues we need to address, while beautiful landscape photography shows us what we should strive to preserve. But a UK company called Co2ncience is going a step further.

They’re actually merging eco-friendliness with photography in a very tangible way, by being the world’s first (by their estimation) to turn recycled plastic bottles into wall art. Read more…

How an Instagram Hashtag is Helping to Clean up the Environment

litterati2

Starting a global movement using a photography app is no small task, but that’s what Jeff Kirschner has done this last year. Using the hashtag #litterati, he’s managed to start a world-wide Instagram campaign that is helping to stop pollution and clean up the environment one piece of trash at a time. Read more…

Photo of Laser Pointer Through Rain Reveals Water Drop “Snowflakes”

On a rainy day recently, light painting photographer Jeremy Jackson was playing around with a green laser pointer when he discovered something interesting: all the out of focus raindrops in the photograph had a lined pattern in them — and each one was unique! These “water drop snowflakes” were found in all of the photos he took that day.

Anyone know what causes this phenomenon?

(via DIYPhotography)


Image credit: Photograph by Jeremy Jackson and used with permission