Posts Tagged ‘graphics’

New Top Level Domains for Photographers, Grab Them While They Last

As was inevitable, the more common and generic top level domains (e.g. .com, .net, and even .co) are becoming scarce as more and more domains are registered each day.

Knowing this moment in time would come, ICANN, the authority in charge of managing domain names, has been putting out more and more top level domains in hopes of opening up more options for those looking to grab their own piece of the web — and photographers are benefiting more directly than most. Read more…

Mind-Blowing Research Into Inserting Artificial Objects into Photographs

We always get a laugh when news organizations or governments try to pass off bad Photoshop jobs as real images, but with the way graphics technology is advancing, bad Photoshop jobs may soon become a thing of the past. Here’s a fascinating demo into technology that can quickly and realistically insert fake 3D objects into photographs — lighting, shading and all. Aside from a few annotations provided by the user (e.g. where the light sources are), the software doesn’t need to know anything about the images. Mind-blowing stuff…

Rendering Synthetic Objects into Legacy Photographs (via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

Researchers Come Up With Quick Way of Generating Realistic Lens Flare

Artificial lens flare is an important part of making certain computer generated scenes look realistic, but up to this point creating realistic lens flare has been a task that requires a good deal of processing power. Now, researchers have come up with a way to simulating lens flare quickly and accurately, taking into account a large number of physical factors that cause the phenomenon:

The underlying model covers many components that are important for realism, such as imperfections, chromatic and geometric lens aberrations, and antireflective lens coatings.

The video above discusses how the technology works, and also touches on the science behind lens flares. The method is patent-pending, and will be presented later this year at SIGGRAPH 2011.

Physically-Based Real-Time Lens Flare Rendering [Max-Planck-Institut Informatik]

Animation Showing How the Canon 10D and 24-85mm Lens are Assembled

This animation was created by students of the Engineering 128: Advanced Engineering Design Graphics course at UC Berkeley during the Spring 2008 semester. The first part shows a Canon 10D DSLR exploding into its individual parts, and then those parts coming together again to slowly rebuild the camera, while the second part does the same for a Canon 24-85mm lens. Pretty dang impressive considering that it’s for an undergraduate course.

100 Cameras, Lenses, and Accessories Turned into Pixel Illustrations

Artist Billy Brown took 100 different pieces of photography gear and turned them into pixel art. What’s neat is that he’s making them available for any kind of use as long as you credit him. There’s everything from old film and Polaroid cameras to memory cards and the latest telephoto lenses.

The Camera Collection (via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

NBA Jam for Wii Incorporates Photos into Game Graphics

Boom shaka laka! If you’re familiar with 90s arcade games, you might recall NBA Jam, the over-the-top basketball sim. EA Sports is developing a remixed, updated version of the classic for the Nintendo Wii, to be released this fall. As a major part of their art design, the game uses real photographs of NBA players’ heads, attached to digitized bodies.

Instead of conventional animation, the developers chose to use larger scaled photos of the players’ heads which change depending on their performance and experiences.

These digital Frankensteins are a clever way to update the game’s artwork while retaining the larger-than-life, old school feel that continues to endear so many fans 17 years after the original game was released.

(via 1up)

Breathtaking Photorealistic CG Animation

Computer-generated animation has come a long way in recent years and has made films more and more realistic, from the photographic-technique effects in Pixar’s WALL-E, to the stunning landscapes in Avatar. The Third & The Seventh by Alex Roman is a great example of just how beautiful and realistic CG animations can be. It’s an artistic piece dealing with architecture and photography, and you’ll notice many camera techniques throughout the film.

Before I learned it was fully computer generated, I actually had no idea, and thought it was simply beautiful filming. The video is actually going viral, with over 200,000 views in the past two days. If you don’t believe it was CG, check out the following video, which is similar to a “behind-the-scenes” look into how some of the scenes were created:

There’s also a separate “making-of” video for a particular shot, if you’re interested.

Be sure to view it full screen for maximum effect, and be ready to be blown away!