Posts Tagged ‘gps’

Geotagged Wildlife Photos Help Poachers Kill Endangered Animals

whiterhino

If you care about endangered animals that are hunted for their parts, here’s something important you should keep in mind: make sure you scrub the GPS data on the images prior to sharing them online. Poachers have reportedly been turning to geotagged photos on social networks in order to find out where they can make their next kill.
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9 Features Every DSLR Should Have Now

dslrcut

They say that the DSLR’s better days are behind it, but it’s still the choice for most working pros. Rapid advances on point and shoots, ILCs (mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras) and smart phones have left the DSLR looking like the camera of yesteryear, so here are a few features we think every DSLR should have now. Read more…

Tutorial: How to Remove Location Info from Your Images in Photoshop

Privacy is a big concern these days, what with the NSA looking over both your shoulders, reading your emails and chiming in on your cell phone conversations. And while you might not be able to “fight the man” as it were, you can protect your privacy a bit by learning how to remove sensitive location information from the photos you post online. Read more…

Photos of Locations Where Geotagged Tweets Were Sent

Creeper

The photograph above shows the location where the following Tweet was posted:

Love hiding in the back at work because I have a 35 year old creeper. #scared #help

It’s one of the photos in a project titled Geolocation: tributes to the Data stream, by photographers Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman. Each image in the series shows the location were a particular geotagged Twitter Tweet was posted.
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Geotagged iPhone Photograph Leads to Fugitive Software Tycoon’s Downfall

The saga of anti-virus pioneer John McAfee’s run from the law is a strange one, but this much is clear: McAfee wishes geotagging wasn’t a feature built into modern cameras. After a month of fleeing from Belizean law enforcement after a neighbor was found murdered, the software tycoon was finally taken into custody this week, largely due to a single photo loaded with GPS data.
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Build a DIY Bluetooth GPS Unit for Your Nikon DSLR

Israeli photographer Ido Nassimi wanted to geotag the photographs shot using his Nikon D90, but didn’t want to shell out $200 bucks for Nikon’s official GP-1 GPS receiver. Since he had a GPS Bluetooth receiver lying around, he decided to do some research and make it compatible with his DSLR. He ended up successfully building one for around $50.
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Why Your Digital Camera’s GPS Might Not Work in China

It’s strange to think that cartography laws could somehow affect the functionality of your camera overseas, but a recent article on Ogle Earth points out that just such a thing has been going on with GPS-enabled cameras as far back as 2010. The whole “investigation” into the matter began with the release of the Panasonic TS4 earlier this year. For some reason the press release cautioned that the GPS in the camera “may not work in China or in the border regions of countries neighboring China.”

But after doing some digging they discovered that these restrictions are not limited to the TS4, nor are they even limited to Panasonic. In fact, many major manufacturers go to great lengths to conceal or toss away the location data captured by GPS-enabled cameras when you’re taking photos in the People’s Republic of China. Read more…

Canon Patents Imprecise EXIF Data for Shooters Concerned with Privacy

9 out of 10 adults in America believe that people are over-sharing sensitive personal information. One culprit is the GPS-enabled camera, which can reveal exactly where you were at a specific time by baking the information into photos. If you’re uncomfortable with how specific this EXIF data is, Canon has a solution: fuzzy precision. The company has patented a system that may one day allow its camera users to choose “low precision” EXIF data. This means cameras would record rough and non-specific details of when and where an image was made. Instead of 12:31pm, it might record it was 12-1pm, and instead of a particular location, it might provide a general area on a map.

(via Egami via Canon Watch)

Turn an Old GPS or Cell Phone Mount Into a Suction Cup Tripod

If you have an old mount for attaching a GPS or cell phone to your windshield, you can upcycle it into a suction cup tripod for your camera (just make sure it’s not the flimsy kind that falls off on its own). What you’ll need to do is flatten the mount surface and then install a tripod screw. Nano_Burger has a step-by-step tutorial on how he did this conversion over on Instructables. The resulting tripod allows you to fix your camera in locations that aren’t accessible to tripods that don’t suck (hah, get it?).

Turn Your GPS Suction Cup Support Into A Camera Tripod (via Lifehacker)

Canon 1D X Has Optional (and Pricey) Wi-Fi and GPS Add-ons

Remember the network and Wi-Fi icons in the Canon patent we shared yesterday? Well, they both appeared today in the Canon 1D X announcement, but only one of them is built in. The new DSLR offers a built-in gigabit Ethernet jack for ultra-fast data transfers, but wireless transfers will require an additional add-on: the WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter. It’s designed exclusively for the new camera, and supports Bluetooth in addition to Wi-Fi. Priced at $600, it costs as much as an entry level DSLR.

There will also be a Canon GP-E1 GPS Receiver add-on for logging location data and camera direction. It’ll have a retail price of $300 when it’s released alongside the camera in March 2012.


In other news, Canon has passed the 70 million mark for EF lenses produced, while Nikon has just produced its 65 millionth SLR lens.