Posts Tagged ‘glass’

Sensor Stack Thickness Part III: Summary

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Well, I have to admit this has been a fun series. I’ve learned a whole lot. That’s what makes this so fun — I get some results I don’t understand, get some help figuring out what is going on, and before I know it, I’ve learned something that explains other things I haven’t been able to understand. Read more…

Tutorial: A Basic Explanation of What a Tilt-Shift Lens Is and How it Works

Tilt-shift lenses are nothing short of optical magic… or so it seems. But as their namesake implies, they actually achieve this ‘magic’ through the use of two clever movements in the lens.

In the short tutorial above, Vincent Laforet, a Canon Explorer of Light and well-known photography educator, explains just how those two components work and how they dramatically impact the look of an image. Read more…

Diving Into the Tech Behind the Lytro Illum and Its Impressive 30-250mm f/2.0 Lens

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Lytro came into the photography world not only to create a novelty product, but to fundamentally change how we approach image capture. Because despite light field photography being around for over a century, it’s only with the latest technology that the company is able to exploit what it is a camera is truly capable of doing.

We recently spoke with Lytro about its upcoming Illum camera a bit, diving into the technology behind the specs and revealing how Lytro’s approach is allowing the company to not only step, but leap into the future. Read more…

Sensor Stack Thickness: When Does It Matter?

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

The first post I made on sensor-stack thickness wallowed deeply in PhotoGeekery. This one is meant to be of practical use so I’ll try to leave the Geek stuff out. We’ll start with the simple facts. Read more…

Glass in the Path: Why Using Adapters May Hurt Your Image Quality

NOTE: This is a Geek Post. If you aren’t into geeky photo measurements, or into adapting lenses from one brand of camera to another, you’ll not be interested.


Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

A year or two ago, I wrote a blog post where I basically showed lenses shot on adapters on other cameras aren’t acceptable for testing. If you run them through Imatest the results aren’t accurate. I suggested that reviewers shouldn’t test lenses on adapters, although obviously adapters are a great way to use interesting lenses to take pictures. Read more…

Sigma Could Be Busy at Photokina, with 4 Potential Lenses on the Way

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Sigma has done nothing but impress over the course of the last year, one piece of quality glass at a time. But as impressive as their Art, Contemporary and Sports glass already is, the company isn’t anywhere near done yet. Read more…

DxOMark Reveals Which Lenses Perform Best on Nikon’s D800E

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It’s fairly well-known that, when it comes to capturing images, more important than almost any camera body is the glass being put in front of it. However, there are times when your camera body plays a vital role in determining the quality of the image rendered by said glass.

To prove this and also help show off what glass performs best with a particular body, DxOMark has published a series of articles that break down what the best lenses are for the Nikon D800E. Read more…

Video: Useful Tips for Buying Second-Hand Lenses

When it comes to buying glass, deciding what you want and how much you’re willing to spend can be difficult even in the best of conditions. So, naturally, when buying second-hand glass, an added layer of caution is needed to make sure you’re getting what you’re looking and paying for. Read more…

North Korea Revealed in Photos Captured on Google Glass

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While Google Glass user Kenny Zhu was in North Korea this past April, he took advantage of the small and comparatively inconspicuous size of the device on his head to snap what appear to be the first images taken in North Korea using the wearable tech. Read more…

Google Glass Becomes Available to the US Public for a Cool $1.5K

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If you’ve wanting to get your paws on a pair of Google Glass, your chances have been few and far between… until now. As of today, Google is opening up the sales of the Google Glass headset to all of the United States, assuming they’re in stock and you have $1.5k to burn. Read more…