Posts Tagged ‘glass’

Google Glass Specs Outed: 5 Megapixel Camera and 720p Video

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Google has officially announced the specs for its Glass wearable computer/camera. Of interest to readers of this blog is the fact that the camera will be able to capture decent photographs — at least resolution-wise. It’ll be a 5-megapixel camera that has WiFi capabilities. The camera will also be able to capture 720p video and audio.
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How to Avoid Ugly Newton Rings When Doing Nikon Glass Scanning

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The Nikon Coolscan 9000ED scanner is an excellent scanner. The included holders are of a very good standard and many extremely useful and high quality optional holders are available. None of them, however, are cheap.
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Could Google Glass Work as a Tool For Street Photography?

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Google Glass has received a lot of criticism, particularly when it comes to privacy. Given the fact you can record video and take photos without people noticing, some could call it an opportunity for taking photos without permission. Now, in my spare time, I take photos with a particular interest in is Street Photography. Candid street photography is taking photos of any stranger without permission. Why is there this controversy over Glass when candid photography without permission is a growing genre of photography? That is my question.
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What Its Like to Shoot Photos and Video with Google Glass Camera Glasses

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Google has put up a slick new website for the Glass augmented reality glasses it’s developing, and today the company released a neat new video that offers a first look at what it feels like to use the glasses during “everyday life” (or perhaps, “while living the life”).
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Humorous Portraits of People with Faces Pressed Against Glass

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The Ugly Truth” is a bizarre series of portraits by photographer Rut Mackel. Each photo features a not-very-pleasing photo of a face that looks flatted and disfigured. No, the subjects don’t actually look like that, and no, Mackel didn’t use any kind of digital manipulation for the photos. She simply asked her subjects to hold a pane of glass and then press their faces against it.
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A Beautifully Filmed Look Inside Sigma’s Lens Factory in Aizu, Japan

We showed you Nikon’s video earlier today, now it’s Sigma’s turn to show what goes into making quality lenses at the company’s factory in Aizu, Japan.

Filmed from the same artistic bent as the Nikon piece, this video show the meticulous process that goes into making quality Sigma glass. Unlike Nikon’s version, this one doesn’t stop until the lens is fully assembled and ready to latch on to the nearest camera. Read more…

A Glimpse Into How Nikon Produces the Optical Glass Used in Its Lenses

Nikon recently put out this short 3-minute video that offers an interesting glimpse into one of the critical steps of lens making: the production of the optical glass. It steps through the various stages of manufacturing, from combining the raw elements through examining the chunks of glass before they’re polished and perfected.
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Recipe for a Photograph: Reflected Ant on Black

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One of my favorite recent projects was a deceptively simple image of an ant on black. Black is easy enough to arrange for the upper portions of a photo. Just make sure foreground lighting is powerful enough to overwhelm the ambient light. Black all around is a challenge, however.
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How to Transfer a Photograph Onto Glass Using Contact Paper

About a year ago, we shared a neat DIY method of transferring black-and-white photos onto blocks of wood. A very similar technique can be used for displaying your photos on glass. Inspired Ideas writes that all you need are a toner-based print of your photo (e.g. using a copier or laser printer) and some clear contact paper.

Sticking the contact paper to your print will transfer the toner from your ordinary paper to the sticky transparent film. The next step is to soak the two connected sheets in water, which softens up the white paper and allows it to be rubbed off. What you’re left with is a piece of wet transparent contact paper that features your photo. Let it dry to restore its stickiness, and then attach the resulting “sticker” to whatever you’d like to show off your photo on (e.g. glass jars, candle holders, windows etc.)

Making Memory Candles [Inspired Ideas via Photojojo]

Turn Solid Glass Objects into Liquid by Splashing Some Water

Here’s a fun weekend photo project for you to try: turn solid glass objects into liquid by splashing water onto them. That’s what Mexico City-based photographer Jean BĂ©rard did for his series titled Liquid Glass. He set various glass vessels onto a table, and photographed them multiple times while splashing the water contained within and tossing water on from the outside.

The photographs were then merged into single composite photos that make the objects look like they’re created entirely out of water.
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