Posts Tagged ‘ghetto’

From Hoodlum to Street Photog, the Story of Jovan ‘Bonna’ Lamb

Jovan ‘Bonna’ Lamb was born and raised in the Overtown neighborhood of Miami, Florida, an area marked by poverty and crime. As a teenager in the area, he’ll tell you that he was “a young hoodlum … becoming a thug” until something happened: he stumbled across a camera. Read more…

Make a DIY Bounce Wall Using Cardboard and a Clothes Hanger

Earlier this week, we shared a funky piece of camera equipment called the Bounce-Wall, which features a large card that serves as a surface to bounce your flash off when you’re out and about. While the pricing wasn’t available at the time, David Hobby of Strobist has since revealed that it’ll carry a $99 when it’s released later this month.

If you don’t have any free benjamins to drop on this product — or don’t want to wait — the fine folks over at Lighting-Academy have created a ghetto do-it-yourself version you can build and use. All you’ll need is an old wire clothes hanger, a piece of cardboard, some aluminum foil, a clothespin, and a tripod screw. The tutorial is in German, so you might need to use an online translater or base your build off the pictures alone.

DIY Wall Bounce for 99 cents [Lighting-Academy via Strobist]

Miroslav Tichý’s Homemade Camera

This might look like a pile of garbage, but it’s actually one of the homemade camera used by photographer Miroslav Tichý from the 1960s until 1985. He made his camera bodies from things he had on hand, including plywood, road asphalt, and thread spools. His lenses would be created from toilet paper tubes with custom lenses created from Plexiglas that had been sanded with sandpaper and then polished with toothpaste and cigarette ashes. For his enlarger, he used sheets of metal, two fence slats, a light bulb, and a tin can. Tichý used his equipment to take thousands of stalker-ish pictures of strangers (mostly women) in the Czech Republic. You can find some of his work here.

(via Flavorwire)

Coffee Sleeves Can Double as Makeshift Lens Hoods When in a Crunch

Flickr user Nick Cool was shooting in Machu Picchu, Perú on a sunny day when he made a helpful discovery: his coffee cup’s sleeve doubled nicely as a makeshift lens hood. While it’s probably not the best thing to use on a regular basis, it’s a clever MacGyver-ish idea that got the job done. For less-ghetto sun shielding that’s just as portable, you can look into printing/making your own lens hood or a nifty new product called the Flex Lens Shade.

(via DYIP)


Image credit: Weatherized Nikon in Peru by Nick Cool and used with permission

Make a DIY Snoot Using a Coke Bottle

You can make yourself a quick and simple snoot by cutting off the upper portion of a soda bottle and covering it with gaffer tape. While it’s definitely not the most elegant solution, it’s a cheap way to isolate your subject when shooting with a flash unit.

How To Make A Snoot From A Coca-Cola Bottle [DIYPhotography]


Image credits: Photographs by Lior Kraisler

Turn an Unwanted Tie into a Camera Strap

Ties are meant to be soft and comfortable around the neck, so they’re a perfect fit for a do-it-yourself camera strap project! Besides an unwanted tie, you’ll need some sewing supposed, some ribbon for the ends, and a couple rings for attaching the strap. Check out the step-by-step tutorial over on Ecouterre.

Recycle a Necktie Into a Camera Strap (via Lifehacker)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

Read more…

Hold Down the Shutter Release with an Eraser and Hair Tie

Need to hold down the shutter release for extended periods of time, but don’t want to shell out money for a remote shutter release? Flickr user Dennis Calvert found that a pencil eraser and hair tie do the job well, allowing you to do star trail photographs with bulb mode.

Do you use a similar “hack” to keep your shutter release button pressed?


Image credit: DIY Intervalometer by Dennis Calvert

Time-Lapse Motion Control Using a BBQ Rotisserie Motor

While adding movement to time-lapse videos is cool, the special equipment (e.g. dollies, cranes, etc…) you need can be pricey. Derek Mellott couldn’t afford to shell out hundreds of bucks for a dolly, so he decided to make his own using things found in his garage. His resulting setup included tripods, a cable management tray, a TI-calculator as an intervalometer, and a BBQ rotisserie motor to slowly pull the camera along.
Read more…

Stop Chopping Heads with Your Camera

You know how you can never manage to frame people properly when taking self-portraits of you and your friends? What? You’ve been getting along just fine? Well, if you do suddenly find yourself with self-portrait ineptitude and randomly feel like spending some dough, you can buy a “Mirror, Mirror on the Camera“, a “cool self-adhesive self-portrait mirror you stick on your camera or cell phone” meant for helping you frame self-portraits better.

The graphic above describes the product well. It turns your camera into a cheapo Samsung TL210 and helps you stop chopping the heads of your subjects. You can pick one up for $8 over at Brightscreen, or save some money and go with a DIY version.

Mirror, Mirror (via Steve’s Digicams)

DIY Follow Focus Created with K’NEX

YouTube user Prippman created this nifty follow focus using pieces of a K’NEX construction toy set and a $5.50 K’NEX battery power pack (that’s even cheaper than the $6 DIY handle we featured yesterday). The resulting system can be used either manually or with the help of the motor pack. Three cheers for ghetto gear!

(via PCWorld)