Posts Tagged ‘geeky’

Wear Your 35mm Negatives as a Necklace

Craftzine has a step-by-step tutorial teaching how to turn your unwanted 35mm film into an uber-geeky necklace. Not sure how comfortable wearing it would be, but if you’re the type that’s constantly looking for new levels of photo geekiness, this one’s for you.

How-To: Film Negative Necklace (via Laughing Squid)

Transform Your Fridge into a Photoshop Workspace with This Magnet Set

You know that blank space around your fridge photos? You can fill it up with Photoshop menu magnets to increase your photographic geek cred by a few stops. This 13 piece magnet set sells for $26 over in the Meninos Store.

Ps Magnet Kit [Meninos Store]

A Camera Tape Dispenser for your Desk

Here’s a old-fashioned wooden camera tape dispenser that would make a cute gift and addition to a photography-lover’s desk.

Quirky and cute, this handy-dandy desk accessory is shaped like a small camera and doles out all the sticky transparent film you need for piecing together pages of paper or posting reminder notes on your computer monitor. When the included roll runs out, simply detach the magnetic knob at the back and slide another one on the reel.

You can pick one up for price of $22 over on ModCloth. It’s a pretty simple design though, so you could also try making your own!

Caught On Camera Tape Dispenser (via KEH Camera Blog)

Look! Up in the Sky! It’s a Bird. It’s a Plane. It’s an Aperture!

This “Sky Aperture” t-shirt is a nice way to sport some photography-related apparel without being too geeky. You can grab it now for $20 over on Threadless, though if you wait you might be able to grab it for $5 or $10 during a sale.

35mm Cropper Lets You See the World Through the Rule of Thirds

Here’s a neat necklace for photo geeks — it’s a 35mm “cropper” that you can use to see what a scene would look like in a photograph. There’s even rule of thirds lines built into it. They’re handmade, crafted in Korea, and cost $49 over on Etsy. If you want an equally geeky tool without paying such a ridiculous price, you can punch the film out of a 35mm slide and use that.

mijonju Etsy Shop (via DIYPhotography.net)

Photo Necklaces for Serious Photo Geeks

We’ve seen camera shaped pendants before, but these new Camera Lingo Necklaces definitely take you into uncharted levels of geekiness. Each one has a “secret code word” that will be appreciated by other photo enthusiasts, but may befuddle ordinary, unenlightened (no pun intended) folk. They come in four colors and designs — JPEG, CR2, NEF, and a no-flash symbol — and cost $20 bucks each over at Photojojo.

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Retro f/stop Lens Bracelets Based on Old Nikon Lenses

If Adam Elmakias’ lens bracelets aren’t retro enough for you, photographic.ly is now selling these f/stop lens bracelets featuring a colorful design based on old Nikon/Nikkor lenses.
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Light Painting Photos That Give a Visual Look at Wi-Fi Signals

Here’s one of the most creative examples of light painting and long-exposure photography we’ve seen — a few techie guys built a special 12-foot-long rod with 80 LED lights that light up depending on how strong a particular Wi-Fi signal is. By walking the stick around and capturing the lights in real time, they were able to photograph “light charts” showing how a particular Wi-Fi signal strength fluctuates in a particular area.

Immaterials: light painting WiFi (via Gizmodo)

Make Unlocking Things Awesome with These Camera-Shaped Key Fobs

F-Stop Searching Key Caps are tiny camera key fobs that help you quickly identify important keys on your keychain. They attach to your keys easily — the key slips in from the top — and come in black, gray, and bright yellow. You can pick one up for $9 over at ModCloth.

F-Stop Searching Key Caps (via KEH Blog)

This Camera Van Has Rolling Shutters

In 1993, a guy named Harrod Blank had a dream in which he drove around in a camera-covered car taking pictures of people staring at his camera-mobile. When he woke up, he decided to make the car a reality, and spent the next two years designing and building the thing. In 1995 he completed the Camera Van complete with a working camera to capture the expressions of onlookers.
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