Posts Tagged ‘fun’

Make a Pair of Paper Aperture Glasses

Instructables user art.makes has a tutorial on how you can make a pair of paper iris glasses with adjustable apertures. You could definitely build upon the idea to make each side more like a camera lens (e.g. adding barrels, f-stop values) — perhaps as part of a geeky Halloween costume?
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How to Photograph Yourself Levitating

Hayashi Natsumi’s levitation photos have received a lot of publicity as of late (check out her blog here), prompting Kai over at DigitalRev to create this short video tutorial teaching the technique. Could be a fun weekend project if you’re looking for something to shoot.

(via Colossal)

The Results of Printing 35mm Film onto Skin Using the Sun

Last week we published a post asking whether anyone had made a “print” on their skin by placing a negative on their skin under the sun. After seeing the post, videographer Jeremiah Warren decided to conduct the experiment for the benefit of all mankind. Taping four slides onto his forearm (he didn’t have any suitable negative film), Warren exposed his skin for four hours in 100-degree heat (consuming a gallon of water in the process).

Check out the video above for his results — the “prints” didn’t turn out as awesome as he had hoped. Using negative film might produce better results since slide film prints a negative image onto skin, but it doesn’t seem like sunlight is focused enough to print a sharp image onto skin.

Jowling: Photos of Violently Shaking Heads at Fast Shutter Speeds

Yesterday we shared some fun portraits of dogs taken while they shook of water, but you can take similar portraits of people too. It’s called “jowling”, and is far less adorable. Here how Urban Dictionary defines “jowling”:

The violent shaking of one’s head side-to-side in order to obtain a photograph of one’s face distorted from the intense side-to-side motion.

One useful thing you can do with this technique is to simulate a heavy punch to the face.
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Recreate Calvin’s Funny Face Portraits

Here’s a fun photo project you can try: recreate each of Calvin’s funny face photographs from Calvin and Hobbes. A version of this project done by a cute Asian boy was a popular viral photo a couple years ago. You can download the original Calvin montage here.

(via Reddit)


Image credit: Photographs by Sabrina and used with permission

Buy this Canon 7D and 70-200mm Piggy Bank to Save Money

This Canon 7D and 70-200mm combo only costs $36 and helps you save money. How? Well it’s actually a fancy piggy bank! Like the Canon 350D and 24-105mm L piggy bank we shared last year, you use this one by shoving coins into the lens.
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Toy Camera Modded with Figurines to Add Tourist Silhouettes to Photos

San Francisco-based photographer Ian Tuttle came up with this funky way of adding silhouettes to his Diana F+ photos without Photoshop — using some Elmer’s glue, he attached a couple 1/8” figurines (the kind meant for model railroads) inside the camera upside down. The resulting photographs show a couple shadowy tourists looking at each scene!

Putting Your Subject Inside Your Camera (via Lomography via Make)

Recreate Your Photographs Using Text

Textify.it is a neat little web and iPhone app that recreates photographs using colored text. Simply drag and drop a photograph from your computer onto the page to get started. The image above is a photograph of Crater Lake that we turned into text using the letters from “PetaPixel”.

Textify.it (via kottke.org)

How to Give Your Bokeh Custom Shapes

Here’s another video tutorial teaching how to give your bokeh custom shapes.

When a point of light in a photograph is out of focus, it turns into a shape defined by the lens’s aperture. We can create a second, smaller, aperture to attach to the front of our lens in order to customize that shape. The result is a charming effect in the background of your photographs, as long as there points of light such as streetlights, candles, or Christmas lights in frame. [#]

You can also find a text version of this tutorial here.

(via Make)

Experiment with Random Lenses by Making Your Own Bellows

DC Watch has a tutorial on how to make your own bellows on which you can use various lenses (toy binoculars, magnifying glass, etc…). Print out the PDF template, then follow the video tutorial above to get started. Here’s a Google Translated version of the tutorial.

Bellows Lens Toy (via Nikon Rumors via Foto Actualidad)