Posts Tagged ‘fourandsix’

Izitru: A Service that Helps You Prove You Didn’t ‘Shop that Photo

hightrust

As digital photographs become easier and easier to create, edit, and share, it’s also becoming easier to doubt the authenticity of photos. There have been quite a few stories in recent days of photojournalists, news organizations, and contest winners throwing their reputations away by using Photoshop to manipulate the truthfulness of photos.

Izitru (pronounced “is it true”) is a new free service that aims to make it easier for honest photographers to prove the authenticity of their images.
Read more…

FourMatch: A Photoshop Plugin That Can Spot Manipulated Photos

Earlier this year, we wrote about a new company called Fourandsix (pronounced “forensics”), a collaboration between a former Photoshop product manager and a professor who’s an expert in digital forensics. The goal of the new startup was to build powerful tools that would make detecting digital photo manipulation easy. Well, the first Fourandsix product is now available.

Called FourMatch, it’s an extension for Photoshop CS5/CS6 that “instantly distinguishes unmodified digital camera files from those that may have been edited.”
Read more…

New Software Suite to Detect Stealthy Image Manipulation

Former Photoshop product manager Kevin Connor and Dartmouth professor (and digital forensic expert) Hany Farid are working together to help put a stop to image manipulation where it doesn’t belong. Putting their two brains together they formed a company called Fourandsix, which is primed to release a full suite of software tools that will help law enforcement officers, photo editors and other interested parties detect secret digital photo manipulation. Read more…

Photo Tampering Throughout History

Image forensics company Fourandsix set up an interesting page called “Photo Tampering throughout History“. It’s an interesting timeline of famous photo manipulations, going as far back as the 1860s — the above left image of General Grant was found by the Library of Congress to actually be a composite of three separate photos! Pretty good for not having access to Photoshop, eh?

Photo Tampering throughout History (via John Nack)