Posts Tagged ‘footage’

Hockey Captured from a Player’s Point of View, Courtesy of Google Glass

While we’re on the subject of Google Glass, check out this interesting use case by hockey player Joseph Lallouz. He decided to wear his Glass during a hockey match in order to capture what the sport looks and feels like from a participant’s point of view.
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Modern Editing Software Used to Improve Film Footage from the Early 1900s

Film footage from the early 1900′s, when hand-cranked cameras were all the technology available, aren’t exactly high-quality. Choppy, jumpy, and sped-up, the people in these films look anything but natural.

One YouTuber, however, has taken it upon himself to enhance some footage from this time period and, in the process, produced something much closer to today’s standards of clarity and stability. Read more…

How Scientists Caught a Giant Squid on Camera

Edith Widder is one of the three scientists that managed to capture the first high-resolution video footage of an actual giant squid. And about a month ago, her TED talk describing how she and her team did it (embedded above) was finally posted online.

Almost 2 stories tall, you would think that something that massive would have already been photographed or video taped. But it was Widder’s common-sense approach that would yield the groundbreaking footage. So, how did scientists manage to finally catch a giant squid on camera? One word: quietly. Read more…

Hipshot Python Script Turns Videos into Faux Long Exposure Photos

fakedlongexposure

Want to create a long exposure photo but don’t have a camera that can keep its shutter open for extended periods of time? Mansour Moufid of Elite Raspberries is working on a script called “Hipshot” that can take ordinary video footage and convert it into a faked long exposure still photo. He writes,

Long-exposure photography is a technique to capture dynamic scenes, which produces a contrast between its static and moving elements. Those parts of the scene which were in motion will appear blurred, creating a nice effect.

[Above] is a long-exposure shot of a stream I took recently. It is technically not a long-exposure photograph, but a simulation; this image was actually generated from a video recording taken with an old iPod, which was then processed in software into a single image. (Forgive the poor quality, I don’t own a good camera. Nonetheless, this image demonstrates the desired effect.)

You can check out the technical details of how the Python script works here. If you want to try it out for yourself, you can download Hipshot over on Google Code.

Simulate long-exposure photography with OpenCV [Elite Raspberries]

Canon 6D Sample Footage Emerges, Shot Using a Pre-Production Model

If you’ve been dying to take a gander at the video recording quality of the new Canon 6D, today’s your lucky day. BBC freelance cameraman Johnnie Behiri got his hands on one of the cameras to test out, and created the above sample video that profiles a small Austrian chocolate shop called Xocolat.
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Face/Off: A Demonstration of Futuristic Face Replacement in Video

If you have two similar photos of two different people, Photoshopping one face onto the other isn’t very difficult. Change that to two video clips of two people talking, and you have a much more challenging task on your hands. That’s the problem Harvard University computational photography graduate student Kevin Dale decided to tackle. His research project, titled “Video Face Replacement,” introduces a way of doing this “digital face transplant” in a relatively automated way. The demonstration video above shows how effective his technique is at doing the ‘shop seamlessly.
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Soldier Captures POV Footage of Intense Firefight with Taliban in Afghanistan

We’ve shared some pretty intense footage captured using helmet-mounted cameras in the past, but perhaps none as crazy as the video above. Shot by a US soldier in Kunar Province, Afghanistan, the video offers a point-of-view look at what it’s like to face machine gun fire from the Taliban. [Editor's note: Be warned -- there's a bit of mature language.]
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Tough Little Camera Captures Its Own Accidental Fall From Plane

On its own, the video above is horribly filmed and some of the most difficult-to-watch footage you’ll ever see, but what it shows makes it fascinating. It’s a point-of-view look at what it’s like to fall 12,500 feet without a parachute… and survive. Skydiver Lucas Damm was jumping out of a plane over British Columbia recently when his helmet-mounted GoPro camera smacked against the plane door and fell out of its holder. The camera, still rolling, fell the entire way down and miraculously escaped without any damage.
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Helmet Cam Strapped to Hunting Falcon Captures “Birds-Eye-View” Footage

Have you always dreamed of soaring high above the Earth… and dive-bombing other birds? If so, this might be the next best thing: some falconers over in the UAE capital of Abu Dhabi recently created a pint-sized helmet cam designed specifically for their hunting falcon.
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Jaw-Dropping Slow Motion Footage of Lightning Shot at 7,207 FPS

Photographer Tom Warner shot this slow motion incredible video of lightning at 7,207 frames per second. APOD writes,

The above lightning bolt starts with many simultaneously creating ionized channels branching out from an negatively charged pool of electrons and ions that has somehow been created by drafts and collisions in a rain cloud. About 0.015 seconds after appearing — which takes about 3 seconds in the above time-lapse video — one of the meandering charge leaders makes contact with a suddenly appearing positive spike moving up from the ground and an ionized channel of air is created that instantly acts like a wire. Immediately afterwards, this hot channel pulses with a tremendous amount of charges shooting back and forth between the cloud and the ground, creating a dangerous explosion that is later heard as thunder. Much remains unknown about lightning, however, including details of the mechanism that separates charges.

It’s amazing how much action goes on in just a blink of the eye.

Single Stroke CG in High Speed (via APOD)


Video credits: Footage by Tom A. Warner/ZTResearch/WeatherVideoHD.TV and used with permission