Posts Tagged ‘filmphotography’

Intricately Detailed Concrete Recreations of Iconic Film Cameras

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Artist Alex Stanton has a thing for photography, but he doesn’t actually take any pictures. His obsession with photography is focused on the vintage gear so many of us adore; gear he’s decided to preserve in extreme detail using a mix of concrete, bronze, copper, brass, patina, rust, iron, epoxy. Read more…

Film Challenge: Photojournalist Tries to Shoot a Day’s Worth of Assignments on Film

Have you ever wondered what it’d be like to shoot film as a photojournalist today? Well, now you have your answer. In the video above, The Camera Store challenged Calgary Sun photojournalist Mike Drew to see if it was even remotely possible to shoot a day’s worth of assignments with only film anymore.

Read more…

Leica Unveils the All-New, All-Mechanical M-A Film Rangefinder

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If removing the LCD from a digital rangefinder just isn’t retro enough for you, Leica has something that even the most adamant of purists won’t be able to dog. Dubbed the Leica M-A (Typ 127), this all-new film rangefinder is 100% mechanical: no built-in light meter, no electronic control, this beauty doesn’t even take batteries.

Forget the Nikon Df, THIS is ‘pure photography.’ Read more…

This DIY Pinhole Camera Was Inspired by the Iconic Diana F

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Ray Panduro knows most everything there is to know about pinhole cameras. As his previous design shows, he’s a determined artist who can get the job done using fairly standard material and a healthy dose of elbow grease.

Today, he adds another masterpiece to his creative pinhole lineup, a Pinholga that is a recreation of the iconic Diana F medium format point-and-shoot. Read more…

Italian Film Company Ferrania to Start Making 35mm and 120 Film Again in Mid-September

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Film photographers are used to options slowly fading away, but today we have news of the opposite variety: a film company making a dramatic return to the game. Originally announced via blog post in July of last year, Italian film company FILM Ferrania is finally preparing to start making film again in mid-September. Read more…

Fujifilm Discontinues Neopan 400 PRESTO 35mm and Fujicolor PRO 400 120 Film

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Queue up Queen’s Another One Bites the Dust, because it’s time to mourn the loss of two more analog films. Despite talk that certain segments of the analog market are doing well, specific types of film that are having a hard time selling continue to kick the bucket.

The most recent of these are Fujifilm’s Neopan 400 PRESTO 35mm black-and-white and Fujicolor PRO 400 120 color film. Read more…

Video Tries to Explain Film Photography to Modern Kids

It’s difficult to fathom, but there is massive segment of the population who remember nothing of film photography. The idea of not having your images instantly available for review and deletion, or having to go to a shop to have a roll of film developed, is as foreign as the floppy disk and the VHS.

BuzzFeed is trying to remedy this somewhat in the video above, which they have dubbed “Film Photography Explained to Modern Kids.” Read more…

Kodak Alaris and Lomography Partner Up, Vow to Keep Film Photography Alive

An elegy for Kodak (and film in general)

Analog photography buffs can rest a little easier: Photographic film is now supported by the combined economic majesty of Lomography and the photographic offshoot of post-bankruptcy Kodak. Read more…

Kodak Alaris Will Keep the Kodak Legacy Alive, Has ‘No Plans’ to Stop Selling Film

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Now that Eastman Kodak’s bankruptcy woes are over and the company has switched its focus primarily to commercial printing, its name probably won’t show up here as often as it once did. But that doesn’t mean that the Kodak photographic legacy is dead.

One of the steps Eastman Kodak took to get out of bankruptcy was to sell its personalized and document imaging businesses to the UK Kodak Pension Plan (KPP), and that has birthed a company that plans to keep that legacy alive: Kodak Alaris. Read more…

Ethereal Double Exposures Merge Digital Glitches with Analog Street Photography

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San Francisco-based photographer and self-proclaimed super nerd Doctor Popular — the same one that made this film canister valentines day card back in February — started off his photographic career with an iPhone. Unlike many photographers, he moved backwards, eventually purchasing a film camera “strictly out of curiosity” at a yard sale and shifting his focus more and more to film.

His most recent endeavor, Glitch Double Exposures, mixes the two worlds of digital and analog by combining street photos with photos of purposely glitched images into ethereal double exposures. Read more…