Posts Tagged ‘filmcamera’

Intricately Detailed Concrete Recreations of Iconic Film Cameras

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Artist Alex Stanton has a thing for photography, but he doesn’t actually take any pictures. His obsession with photography is focused on the vintage gear so many of us adore; gear he’s decided to preserve in extreme detail using a mix of concrete, bronze, copper, brass, patina, rust, iron, epoxy. Read more…

Lomography Unveils the LC-A 120: ‘The World’s Most Compact Fully-Automatic 120 Camera’

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Lomography has officially announced the LC-A 120, a 120 film model of its successful 35mm LC-A+ and LC-Wide cameras. Small and automatic, Lomography has officially deemed this little guy, “the world’s smallest fully-automatic 120 film camera.” Read more…

Nolab Digital Super 8 Cartridge to Breathe New Life into Old Super 8 Film Cameras

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A lot of film people have deep connections to Super 8 cameras, once the medium of choice for everyone from film school students to porn directors. But it’s getting harder and harder to actually use the things, as stocks of film cartridges dwindle.

To the rescue comes Nolab, a project to build a digital adapter that will allow any Super 8 camera to shoot 720p HD video. Read more…

Lomo Releases Special Edition Transparent Konstruktor, An Unusable Film Camera

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Lomography is no stranger to releasing strange cameras — everything from Where’s Waldo editions to a hand-cranked movie camera have crossed our desks — but the Transparent Collector’s Edition Konstruktor is perhaps cooler and definitely less useful than all of those.

That’s because the Transparent Konstruktor camera that Lomography just announces is, as the name implies, a transparent film camera… which also makes it an unusable film camera. Read more…

Blast from the Past: 18,000fps High Speed Photography in the 1960s

Back in 1948, The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers defined high-speed photography as any 3 frames or more captured at a rate at or above 128 frames per second, but even back then high-speed cameras performed well past that mark.

The public domain video above gives us a short peek at how far high-speed photography tech had advanced by the mid-1960s, when Wollensak’s Fastax models were some of the foremost high-speed cameras on the market, capturing action at speeds of up to 18,000fps. Read more…

Photojournalist Develops Last Produced Roll of Kodachrome

It’s the end of an era. Photojournalist Steve McCurry has developed the last roll of Kodachrome film produced by Kodak.

National Geographic has been following the final journey of the last Kodachrome roll ever since Kodak’s announcement last year that it would retire Kodachrome. Kodak has been manufacturing Kodachrome since 1935.

McCurry developed 36 slides on Monday at Dwayne’s Photo Service in Parsons, Kansas, which is the last labs to process the film type. The final images were shot in New York City, but the last three frames were taken in Parsons.

If you’ve got undeveloped canisters of Kodachrome of your own, Dwayne’s will develop them only through December of this year.

(via Associated Press)


Image Credit: Old Kodachrome canisters by Ryan Sahb

Holga Medium-Format 3D Stereo Camera

The Holga 120 3D Stereo Camera is a plastic, medium-format camera that captures two slightly offset images at the same time on 120 film. The resulting images are then viewable in stereo 3D using the special Holga 120 3D Slide Viewer. The camera itself costs $100, but for $150 you also get the 3D viewer, some 120 film, and a set of slide mounts.

If you’d prefer doing 3D photography digitally, Fujifilm’s FinePix REAL 3D W1 can do the trick, though, with an MSRP of $600, it costs nearly six times as much.

(via Gizmodo)