Posts Tagged ‘film’

Kodak Alaris and Lomography Partner Up, Vow to Keep Film Photography Alive

An elegy for Kodak (and film in general)

Analog photography buffs can rest a little easier: Photographic film is now supported by the combined economic majesty of Lomography and the photographic offshoot of post-bankruptcy Kodak. Read more…

Joe McNally, Lynn Goldsmith and Bob Krist on Shooting with the Nikon Df

First comes hype, then comes the announcement, and last comes the post-release marketing. In regards to the Nikon Df, we’ve officially moved into the last of those three steps, and right on cue, Nikon has released three videos of big time photographers endorsing the Df by talking about their experiences shooting with it. Read more…

Does Lighting the Olympic Flame Involve Setting Fire to a Piece of 35mm Film?

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Every two years, the lighting of the Olympic Flame amidst the ruins of the Temple of Hera is a pretty interesting performance. The torch is lit from the light of the Sun, using a parabolic mirror to focus the Sun’s rays on the fuel in the torch and set it ablaze… but what exactly is that fuel? By the looks of it, at least a small part is a piece of 35mm film. Read more…

Blast from the Past: 1965 Pentax Spotmatic Review

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Photography has a rich history that is really fun to peer back into once in a while when you have a spare minute to stop oogling over the next piece of gear (*cough* NEX full-frame *cough*) that’ll steal your heart and most of the funds in your bank account.

On that note, check out this awesome old review of the Pentax Spotmatic. It was written in 1965 by the late Fred Springer-Miller, and it might make you think twice before you take today’s technology for granted. Read more…

Blast from the Past: Vintage Commercial for the Nimslo 35mm 3D Camera

Sure, the 1980s isn’t quite so far in the past as, say, the first photo, but the commercial above is classic nonetheless. It shows off the Nimslo 35mm 3D camera, the first consumer level 3D lenticular camera of the 80s and, if you believe the commercial, “the most important new camera of your lifetime.” Read more…

Miley Cyrus’ Nikon N80 SLR is Currently Bidding at Over $90K on eBay

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We hate to contribute in any small way to the Miley Cyrus hoopla/shenanigans/ruckus (pick your poison) but when an old 35mm SLR that would normally go for about $60 starts bidding at almost $100,000 we can’t help but take notice.

The camera in question is an old 35mm Nikon N80 SLR, and as you might have already guessed, the reason it’s going for so ridiculously much is that … well … Miley is selling it. Read more…

Kodak Alaris Will Keep the Kodak Legacy Alive, Has ‘No Plans’ to Stop Selling Film

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Now that Eastman Kodak’s bankruptcy woes are over and the company has switched its focus primarily to commercial printing, its name probably won’t show up here as often as it once did. But that doesn’t mean that the Kodak photographic legacy is dead.

One of the steps Eastman Kodak took to get out of bankruptcy was to sell its personalized and document imaging businesses to the UK Kodak Pension Plan (KPP), and that has birthed a company that plans to keep that legacy alive: Kodak Alaris. Read more…

‘Long Live Film’ Documentary Explores Love for Analog Photography

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Congratulations, new adopters of film photography — you’re now officially a subculture!

The defining point, of course, is having an independent documentary film about your movement, and that’s just what mail-order processor Indie Film Lab is doing with “Long Live Film.”
Read more…

Color in Filmmaking: From the First Color Photograph to Digital Color Manipulation

Long before there was any way to capture colors on film, filmmakers were hand painting their short movies frame by frame to breathe life into black-and-white productions. The desire to capture color, it seems, far precedes our ability to do so.

In the Filmmaker IQ video above, John Hess takes you through a comprehensive history of color in filmmaking. From hand-tinting, to Technicolor, to digital color manipulation, take a look and see just how far we’ve come when it comes to capturing the reds, greens and blues of our world. Read more…

High-Res DIY Film Scanner Made from a DSLR, Lumber and an Arduino

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Consumer film scanners don’t provide enough detail, and professional models require too much money and pampering. What’s a dedicated film nerd to do? For Peter De Smidt, the answer was to build his own high-res scanner using the Nikon D600 and 50mm Micro lens he already had on hand, a bit of lumber and a lot of patience. Read more…