Posts Tagged ‘film’

Photographer Captures Ethereal Photographs by First Soaking Her Film in Urine

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Most of us baby our film, making sure it’s kept at the right temperature so that it produces the best possible photos when we finally do use it. Photographer Brigette Bloom takes a different approach: she pees on hers… seriously.

For her series Float On, the Hawaii-based photog produced ethereal imagery by soaking the film in a cup of her own pee before she ever went out to shoot it. Read more…

Video: A Comprehensive Guide to Developing Your Own Color Film

If you’ve ever been interested in developing your own film, but don’t know where to get started, this comprehensive video by YouTube user Photography_Bloke might be just the resource you’ve been looking for.

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Pinolga: A Pinhole Medium-Format Holga Look-Alike Made Out of Cardboard

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Raymundo Panduro of Pixel Análogo recently created the camera above, which he calls the “Pinolga“. It’s a realistic pinhole Holga medium format camera made out of cardboard that can take pretty impressive photographs.
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Lomography’s Cine200 Tungsten Film is Cinema Film Repackaged for 35mm Stills

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Lomography released yet another unique type of film emulsion. Or rather, it’s managed to repackage an existing emulsion, converting it for use in 35mm cameras.

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These Creative Wedding Invitations Made from Film Canisters are Perfect for Photographer Couples

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If you’re a photo lover and you happen to be getting married to another photo lover, you’re going to (at the risk of sounding repetitive) love this little DIY project that photog couple Katie and Kyle put together for their wedding.

Rather than sending out typical wedding invites to all of the friends and family they wanted to join them on their special day, they decided to make these super creative invites using rolls of 35mm film instead! Read more…

A Beautiful Look at the Meticulous Process Behind Large Format Photography

In the world of analogue photography, the larger you go in format, the more time, discipline and resources it typically takes to capture and develop your photographs. And while the age-old technique of developing film takes due diligence no matter the format, large format photography in particular has a certain quality to the process that makes it stand out from the rest.

The above video, shared by photographer Lúis Plácido, takes a captivating look at that process. Read more…

Photographer Notebooks for Conveniently Recording Your Film Photos’ Metadata

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Digital cameras naturally present us with a number of advantages, among them the oft-overlooked inclusion of detailed information about how (and often where) the photographs we captured, otherwise known as metadata.

Analog shooters don’t have this luxury. We usually resort to either forgoing it completely, scratching down notes with whatever pen and paper we have handy, or utilizing an application created for this purpose. That’s where a new notebook designed by Ilott Vintage comes in. Read more…

Photog Hopes to Mass-Produce Chemically Altered Film with Help from Kickstarter

It was almost a year ago to the date that we featured the work of photographer Matther Cetta. In a series titled Photogenic Alchemy, he took rolls of film he had photographed with his toy camera and developed them in a number of strange ingredients — from Drano to Pepto Bismol.

The conglomeration of chemicals used throughout the series gave each photograph a unique look that couldn’t be replicated any other way; and now, he’s hoping to take this aesthetic public with some help from crowdfunding platform Kickstarter. Read more…

Short Documentary Tells the Story of the Last Rolls of E6 Film Developed by Orms

Earlier this year, renowned Cape Town photography store Orms developed their last roll of slide film through the E6 process. To bring the era of a legendary process to a proper close, Hero AV brought together a short documentary depicting three photographers who were asked to shoot the last of the slide film that would be developed at the lab. Read more…

The Story Behind Robert Capa’s Pictures of the D-Day Invasion that Almost Never Were

TIME’s Behind the Picture recently dove into the fascinating story behind how some of the most iconic photographs of World War II almost never were. Narrated by John Morris, Editor of LIFE magazine during WWII, Morris tells the story behind the photographs captured by Robert Capa on Omaha Beach during the D-Day invasion. Read more…