Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Alphabet Created by Shooting the Logos Found on the Backs of Semis

“Alphabet Truck” is a project that took photographer Eric Tabuchi four years and thousands of miles of driving to complete. He photographed the giant logo letters found on the back of 18-wheelers, capturing one for each of the 26 letters of the alphabet. The end result is beautiful, creative, and difficult to replicate.

Alphabet Truck (via Photojojo)

Autofocus Point Selection Screen on the Fujifilm Finepix X100

Here’s a glimpse at how selecting an autofocus point works on the upcoming Fujifilm Finepix X100. The hybrid viewfinder — which overlays an electrical viewfinder view over the optical view — provides a rich user-interface previously impossible for fully optical viewfinders.

(via Photo Rumors)

Panasonic Lumix FX77 Can Whiten Teeth and Apply Makeup to Faces

Panasonic wants to move portrait retouching off of computers and directly into cameras. Their Lumix FX77 compact camera released last week has a “Beauty Retouch Mode” that allows users to make all kinds of edits to faces immediately after capturing the photo:

The Beauty Retouch Mode makes it possible to virtually makeup the faces. In Esthetic Mode, various effects can be applied to the face including clearing the skin texture, whitening of teeth and so on. In the Make-up Mode, you can choose the color of foundation, lips, cheeks or eye-shadow. [#]

The photoshopping capabilities aren’t limited to what can be done naturally — users can also do chin lifts and eye enlargements!
Read more…

X-pire! Software Adds a Self-Destruct Feature to Your Digital Photos

A new German company called X-Pire wants to give you a little more peace of mind with photographs you share online by allowing you to share them with a time-based “self-destruct” feature. According to Yahoo News,

The software should prevent the increasingly frequent occurrence of someone being refused a job or running into other embarrassing difficulties after posting a photo that maybe should have been kept private.

Before the user posts the photo, he or she drags it into the programme which assigns it an electronic key that is valid for a limited time period, said Michael Backes, founder of X-Pire.

If someone wishes to view that photo later, the server checks whether the photo has “expired” and blocks it from being displayed if its time is up.

While this might be effective in dealing with certain privacy situations, it doesn’t prevent people from downloading the “protected” photos since anything that’s visible online can be downloaded (e.g. a screenshot of it can be taken). Still, it’s an interesting attempt at a solution for people wary of having embarrassing photographs come back to haunt them in the future. It’ll be available by the end of Jan 2011 with a subscription-based cost of €24 ($32) per year.

(via Engadget)

PBS Feature on Photographer Alec Soth

PBS NewsHour recently aired this interesting and inspiring video profiling photographer Alec Soth, providing a glimpse into what it’s like to work as a fine art photographer. Here’s an interesting quote by Soth in the video,

In a world where there are 500,000 pictures a second being uploaded onto Facebook, what does it mean to be a photographer in that environment?

Soth’s career got a jump start after he was selected for the 2004 Whitney Biennial, and he became a member of Magnum Photos in 2008. Visit Soth’s website here.

(via duckrabbit)

Goodbye Kodachrome: Last Processing Facility Discontinues Support

After Kodak announced the end of Kodachrome’s production in June of 2009, the number of photo labs that developed the film began to dwindle until finally only Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas remained as the lone certified Kodachrome processing facility in the world. Today, they will be processing their last roll of Kodachrome, bringing the film’s storied career in the photo industry to an end. CBS News Sunday Morning did a neat feature looking back on the popular film.

Facebook Adds Facial Recognition to Photo Tagging

Tagging friends in massive group photographs is about to get a whole lot easier. Facebook has just announced “tag suggestions”, which uses facial recognition technology to automatically group together photographs that have the same face in them.

Because photos are such an important part of Facebook, we want to be sure you know exactly how tag suggestions work: When you or a friend upload new photos, we use face recognition software—similar to that found in many photo editing tools—to match your new photos to other photos you’re tagged in. We group similar photos together and, whenever possible, suggest the name of the friend in the photos. [#]

While many people will probably opt for the old fashioned tagging method to have more control over the process, this feature will undoubtedly save many users a good deal of time. The feature will begin rolling out to users in the US over the next few weeks.

Locking Mode Dial Upgrade for the Canon 5D Mark II and 7D

Canonites in Japan who often find their mode dial inadvertently changed can now choose to have their camera upgraded with a locking mode dial. The service upgrade costs ¥10,500 (~$125) and adds a button to the center of the mode dial that must be pressed before the dial can be changed. Maybe DSLR makers should find a way to have this be an available (but not mandatory) option on all DSLR models. What do you think?

Announcement on Canon Japan (via Photography Bay)


Update: This upgrade will be available in the US starting December 6th, 2010.

Casio EX-H20G Uses Hybrid GPS System to Track Your Location

Just unveiled at Photokina, Casio’s new EXILIM EX-H20G point-and-shoot is a pretty ordinary 14.1 megapixel HD video-capable camera with a trick up its sleeve: a hybrid GPS system for geotagging your photos. Ordinarily cameras geotag your images with location based on signals from GPS satellites, but become oblivious to where you are if you move to a location where the signals can’t be detected. The EX-H20G attempts to overcome this problem by storing the user’s last known satellite location in the camera’s memory, and then using data from internal motion sensors to calculate where the user has moved to since the signal was lost.

It’s not clear yet how accurate this hybrid system is, or whether the camera needs to stay on for all this to work. If it does indeed work as advertised, then this is a pretty nifty solution to a common problem. The camera will be available in November 2010 for $350.

Apple Adds HDR Photography to the iPhone and iPod Touch

Apple had a special event this morning where they announced a few new products. In addition to the introduction of HD-video recording on the iPod Touch, an interesting new announcement was the HDR Photography feature in iOS 4.1, which is found on the iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad (though the iPad doesn’t currently have a camera).

On the Apple website, the description of this feature reads:

Take great photos that capture a wider range of light intensity using the new high dynamic range (HDR) setting on iPhone 4, which automatically combines multiple exposures into a single HDR image.

Hopefully the feature is flexible and allows the user to tweak the resulting photograph.

Automatic HDR modes are becoming increasingly common on consumer cameras, and may become a ubiquitous feature before long. You’ll be able to download the iOS 4.1 update soon.