Posts Tagged ‘fastcompany’

Comedians Key and Peele Having a Blast Improvising at a Photo Shoot

Comedians Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele were recently asked to participate in a photo shoot for Fast Company‘s “100 Most Creative People.” And although we’ve taken part in spreading the word when it comes to making sure your models are happy and comfortable, the Fast Company photographers didn’t have to worry about it for this shoot — before long the two comics were in their element. Read more…

Facial Recognition May Get Really Creepy Really Soon

Facial recognition features are appearing in everything from cameras to photo-sharing sites, but have you thought about the different security and privacy concerns it introduces? Fast Company has published a piece on how mobile apps in the future may be able to quickly look up your identity, your personal information, and perhaps even your social security number!

[CMU researchers] used three relatively simple technologies to create their face recognition system: An off-the-shelf face recognizer, cloud computing processing, and personal data available through the public feed at social networking sites such as Facebook [...] Combining the data gathered from the face recognizer hardware with clever search algorithms that were processed on a cloud-computing platform, the team has performed three powerful experiments: They were able to “unmask” people on a popular dating site where it’s common to protect real identities using pseudonyms, and they ID’d students walking in public on campus by grabbing their profile photos from Facebook.

Most impressively the research algorithm tried to predict personal interests and even to deduce the social security number of CMU students based solely on an image of their face–by interrogating deeper into information that’s freely available online.

You might want to invest in a pair of censorship sunglasses after all!

Your Face Is Your Key [Fast Company]


Image credit: Face Detection Example (Bogdan and Anne) by mr. ‘sto

Instagram Founder Kevin Systrom on Revolutionizing Photo Sharing

FastCompany paid a visit to the Instagram offices in San Francisco recently to chat with founder Kevin Systrom:

CEO Kevin Systrom and the Instagram team are exactly what you picture when thinking of scrappy startup entrepreneurs: four guys in a room. Literally, there are only four people at Instagram. And they’re working in a corner of a shared tech office in San Francisco’s South Park neighborhood.

Some interesting facts mentioned in the interview: the service is growing at a rate of 1.3-1.4 million users per month, they’re planning an Android version, they haven’t spent a dime on marketing, and the current app is only the “tip of the iceberg” in their plans to change how we take and share photos.

Kevin Systrom Says Instagram Is More Than Just A Pretty Picture [FastCompany]

How (And Why) Photos Are Selected for the Bing Homepage

In the middle of last year, Google finally gave users the option of customizing its homepage with a photograph. Microsoft’s Bing search engine, however, has featured photography ever since it launched in 2009. Fast Company has an interesting article about how the photographs are an integral part of the strategy for stealing users from Google:

You might not imagine a bunch of editors running around looking for sexy, captivating photographs all day at Microsoft, but that’s exactly the case at Bing [...] Every few weeks, the team gathers for a few hours to vote photographs up or down gathered from 14 different image providers, including the Bill Gates-owned Corbis.

Over the years, the team has started to learn what images entice users most. Event-specific photographs, for instance, tend to drive tons of traffic: images from India’s Holi festival, for “national squirrel appreciation day,” or of a solar eclipse.

Bing also sees big traffic “anytime we put animals up,” says Horstmanshof. “People just love animals.”

This also explains why large format newspaper photoblogs have exploded in popularity over the past few years.

How Bing’s Editors Choose Sexy Images To Seduce You Away From Google [Fast Company]