Posts Tagged ‘famous’

Famous Explosion Photos Recreated with Cauliflower

Photographer Brock Davis likes playing with food. Among his food related experiments are recreations of famous explosions done with cauliflower. The image above shows the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.
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Famous Photographers Holding Their Iconic Photographs

San Diego-based photographer Tim Mantoani has an awesome project and book titled “Behind Photographs” that consists of 20×24-inch Polaroid portraits of famous photographers posing with their most iconic photographs. The film costs $200 per shot, and Mantoani has created over 150 of the portraits already since starting the project five years ago.
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Famous Black and White Photos with Color Breathed Into Them

Swedish artist Sanna Dullaway recently started a business in which she restores and colorizes old black and white photographs. To show off her skills, she decided to colorize some famous B&W photographs captured throughout history.
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Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Still think Adobe’s Image Deblurring technology is fake? Check out this before-and-after comparison showing what the feature does to one of the most famous camera-shake photos in history: Robert Capa’s D-Day photograph of an American soldier landing on Omaha Beach.
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Photos Recreating Famous Works of Art

Booooooom and Adobe have partnered up for a photo project and contest called “Remake“, which asks people to recreate famous works of art using photography.
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Would Photography Greats Still be Great in Our Time?

Have you ever wondered whether hall of fame athletes from decades ago would still find success if the played their sports today? How about the same question, but applied to photographers? Would the historical greats of photography be brilliant across all ages, or were they simply pioneers and ahead of the curve in their generation? If they were just starting out today, which of the famous photographers throughout history do you think would still become renowned in the present day, and which wouldn’t?

Famous Photos Seen Through Instagram Filters

What would famous photographs look like if the photographers who created them had been using Instagram? That’s a question that’s answered by Mastergram, a site that takes the work of renowned photographers and passes them through Instagram filters.
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The Stories Behind Photographer William Klein’s Contact Sheets

This short film, found in Contacts, Volume 1, is a fascinating video in which photographer William Klein takes us beyond his iconic images to discuss the stories revealed in his contact sheets.

The picture is taken at 1/125 of a second. What do you know of a photographer’s work? A hundred pictures? Let’s say 125. That comes out to one second. Let’s say, more like 250 photographs? That would be a rather large body of work. And that would come out to two seconds. The life of a photographer — even of a great photographer, as they say — two seconds.

It’s always awesome listening to well-known photographers talk about their work.

Iconic Photo Exposed: Migrant Mother

For every iconic photograph that’s out there, there was likely a number of other photographs taken at the same time that many people probably have never seen. One such photo is Migrant Mother by Dorothea Lange — an image that became one of the defining photos of the Great Depression. The woman in the photo, Florence Owens Thompson, had been travelling with her family when their car’s timing chain snapped. After setting up a temporary camp to wait while her husband and two sons went to town for repairs, Dorothea Lange drove up and spent 10 minutes capturing 6 photos.
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Magnum Photographer Group Portrait

How do a group of the world’s premier photographers shoot a group portrait? Well, just like the rest of us! This short one minute video shows photographer René Burri — who made iconic photos of Che Guevara and Pablo Picasso — shooting the group portrait at the end of this year’s meeting between Magnum Photo members (something he’s done for 30 years).

Kudos to anyone who can identify the camera Burri used and the people in the group photo shown at the end.

(via PDN Pulse via The Click)