Posts Tagged ‘facebookphotos’

Facebook Photos Employee Posts Step-by-Step Instructions for Stealing Grad Photos

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It takes about 13 steps (give or take a step) to steal a graduation proof off of the Grad Images website and remove the watermark in Photoshop, but it only takes one step to get everybody in the photo community to hate you: post those 13 steps online in a cheeky blog post about “freeing” your grad photos.

Which brings us to Jesse Chen, a software engineer, graduate of UC Berkley and member of the Facebook Photos team who saw nothing wrong with posting detailed photo theft instructions on his blog for his fellow graduates. Read more…

Uploading Too Many Photos to Facebook Makes People Like You Less, Study Finds

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Those of you who have been waiting for a scientific reason to tell some of your friends to stop cluttering your Facebook News Feed with a new photo every 5 minutes need wait no more. A new study out of the UK examining the effects of sharing photos on social networks recently found that uploading too many photos (as well as the wrong type) can actually make people like you less. Read more…

Secretbook App Lets You Share Secret Messages Through Facebook Photos

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Steganography is the art of passing secret messages in a way that most observers wouldn’t detect even though the message is in plain view. Unlike cryptography, which attempts to transmit messages as nonsense, steganography uses security through obscurity, relying on the fact that most people aren’t looking for secret messages in ordinary things. Passing notes in invisible ink would be one example.

Owen-Campbell Moore, a computer science researcher over at Oxford University, has been developing a method for passing secret messages through Facebook photo sharing.
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Two Photogs, One Idea: Taking Portraits of All Your Facebook Friends

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Back in April of last year, we featured an interesting project by photographer Tanja Hollander. Dubbed The Facebook Portrait Project, Hollander has spent the last year travelling around the world and taking portraits of all her Facebook friends. The project’s motivation was half photographical and half philosophical, an exploration of the definition of “true” friendship that Hollander is still in the midst of today.

As she found out recently, however, she’s not the only one: photographer Ty Morin has embarked on a similar journey. And even though they say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the amount of attention the press has been giving Morin’s imitation has left Hollander feeling anything but flattered. Read more…

Linkin Park Browser-Based Music Video Incorporates Your Facebook Photos

Linkin Park has released a new music video that makes creative use of online photos. Visit the website for the song “Lost in the Echo”, and you’ll be asked to connect with the music video using your Facebook account. Once you provide it with access, it crunches some data, and then starts playing. The video starts out like many other videos, showing a group of people in what appears to be some kind of post-apocalyptic hideout. Then one of the characters pulls out a suitcase with photos, and something catches you eye: personal photos from your Facebook albums are shown inside the video!
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Facebook Launches Its Own Camera App

Huge news came out of the Facebook universe today with little to no warning: Facebook has launched its own camera app. Seemingly out of nowhere, the social networking giant has launched its own “Facebook Camera” camera app that, of course, connects directly to your Facebook account, making it that much easier to take, upload, tag, and comment on your photos. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Facebook Acquires Lightbox Team on its Way to Photo Sharing Supremacy

Just over a month after making headlines with their $1 billion Instagram acquisition, Facebook have now made another power move towards their now obvious goal of interstellar domination photo-sharing supremacy. This time their target was the seven-person team behind the popular Android photo sharing app Lightbox. Unlike with Instagram, Facebook isn’t acquiring the company; instead they’re simply absorbing the Lightbox Team. According to their blog, Lightbox is no longer accepting sign-ups and all current users now have until June 15th to download their photos by following this link.

(via Lightbox via Engadget)

Facebook Mobile Overhaul Makes Photos More Prominent

If you’ve been browsing Facebook on your mobile device today you may have noticed something was different. That’s because just yesterday the social-networking giant took a few tips from their recent acquisition Instagram by making the photos on both their mobile applications and mobile website up to three times larger. Individual posts and photos now show up using the width of the whole screen (as seen above) and even photo albums include much larger previews than before, helping you to decide whether or not it’s really worth it to ditch the news feed and explore the upload, or just keep scrollin’ on down.

(via TechCrunch via Engadget)

Facebook Increases Maximum Photo Size to 2048px, Adds Lightbox

Just earlier this year Facebook upped their maximum photo size to 720px, an increase of 20%. Today, they’ve announced that the maximum size is increasing to 2048px, about eight times larger than the previous maximum size. A download link will be included with photos allowing people to download the high resolution versions.
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Facebook Snaps Up Divvyshot

Divvyshot, a Y Combinator funded service that launched publicly last month, has been acquired by Facebook. Divvyshot’s 3 employees will begin applying their know-how to Facebook Photos and the service will be shut down within 6 weeks, leaving its 40,000 users to find somewhere else to share photographs.

The service was based around the idea that photographs can be better shared between friends and family by allowing people to easily contribute to a pool of photographs based around people, places, and events. For example, a group of friends on vacation could contribute photographs to the same collection, which is called an “event”.

There’s already similar ideas of collaboration built into Facebook (i.e. viewing all photographs tagged with a certain person), but it looks like Facebook wants to take the idea even further.