Posts Tagged ‘eyesight’

All Those Hours Editing on Your Computer Aren’t Actually Ruining Your Eyesight

If you’re worried that spending hours upon hours staring at a computer post-processing thousands of photos will damage your eyeballs, rest assured: it won’t. And the video above by the folks at DNews explains why that is. Read more…

Use Gunnar Glasses to Reduce the Strain Post-Processing Puts On Your Eyes

Since launching back in 2007, Gunnar glasses have received a considerable amount of attention in the tech world for their ability to combat computer vision syndrome (CVS). If you spend hours upon hours every day staring at your computer monitor while post-processing your photographs, you might have experienced the symptoms of CVS, which include eye fatigue, visual stress, irritation, burning, tearing, and dryness. Here’s the description of Gunnar glasses on the company’s website:

GUNNARS increase contrast, comfort and focus while minimizing eye fatigue and visual stress for anyone who spends long hours staring at digital screens. GUNNAR eyewear is powered by i-AMP lens technology comprised of a proprietary lens material in an advanced geometry tuned for intermediate viewing distance and finished with custom formulated lens filters, tints and coatings.

If you want to give it a shot, here’s some good news: until September 11, 2012, Woot is selling a number of Gunnar glasses for up to 77% off the price you’ll find at retail outlets. Instead of $100-$190, you can pick one up for just $35-$50. The ones being sold are marketed towards video gamers, but should work just fine for photographers as well.

Gunnar Gaming Glasses on Woot (via Lifehacker)

Woman Born Completely Blind Now a Successful Photographer

Cincinnati native Amy Hildebrand was born completely blind due to albinism, a disorder in which the body is unable to produce melanin (the pigment that gives color to hair, skin, and eyes). After receiving a special surgery as a teen that drastically improved her eyesight, Hildebrand fell in love with photography and went on to study it in college. She is now a successful commercial photographer and is nearly finished with an ambitious “1000 photos in 1000 days” project she started in 2009. Her mother says that Amy’s albinism is actually an advantage in her photography:

As sighted people we have so much information we are processing because our eyesight is seeing so much. It complicates it. But in Amy’s view of the world, she’s so used to seeing things in intimate spaces, that she’s learned to appreciate what’s in front of her. [#]

You can find Hildebrand’s commercial work here, and her photography blog here.

Blind From Albinism, Photographer Uses Camera for Eyes (via Photojojo)