Posts Tagged ‘eyes’

Tutorial: How to ‘Make Eyes Look Amazing’ In Photoshop

One of our favorite Photoshop tutorial websites, Phlearn, yesterday put out a tutorial that is both incredibly useful and a bit scary. Useful because making eyes pop in post is probably one of the most sought after Photoshop skills. Scary because this kind of manipulation is a slippery slope that could lead to photographers getting lazy and using the “fix it in post” excuse… so proceed with caution. Read more…

Canon Australia Knocks it Out of the Park With Stunning #WhatDoYouSee Promo

Nothing like starting hump day off with some visual inspiration, and this promo video, released by Canon Australia earlier this week, certainly fits the bill.

Put together as part of the company’s #whatdoyousee campaign, the video is made up entirely of reflections in people’s eyes that answer the campaign question, “What do you see?” Read more…

All Those Hours Editing on Your Computer Aren’t Actually Ruining Your Eyesight

If you’re worried that spending hours upon hours staring at a computer post-processing thousands of photos will damage your eyeballs, rest assured: it won’t. And the video above by the folks at DNews explains why that is. Read more…

Mesmerizing (or Terrifying?) Macro Photos of Spiders Staring Straight at the Camera

spider_3

Macro photographs of insects are nothing new; and yet, Malaysian Jimmy Kong‘s photographs of spiders staring straight at the camera are immediately captivating and at least a tiny bit terrifying. Read more…

Spend a Day Apart From Your Camera to Recharge Your Eyes and Your Heart

Sometimes the best thing you can do to improve your photography is leave your camera at home.

Yes, practice is imperative if you want to improve. You do need to learn to work your camera instinctively and make a mastery of the technical aspects needed to create beautiful images.
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The Visual Field of the Human Eye

Visual Field

Randall Munroe over at XKCD posted this fascinating comic today that demonstrates some of the peculiarities of human vision. Roll up a piece of paper to set your eyes the correct distance from the screen, and then observe how they perceive things like detail, color, polarization, and more. Click the image above for the large version.

Visual Field by XKCD (via Boing Boing)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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A Quick Trick for Figuring Out Which of Your Eyes is Dominant

One tip that instructors often pass onto the beginning photographers is to use their dominant eye (i.e. the eye they prefer seeing with) to look through the viewfinder. If you want to find out which of your eyes is the dominant one, here’s a quick test you can do: extend your arms straight out and form a small triangle with your hands. Looking through the triangle with both eyes open, frame something nearby (e.g. a doorknob) and place it in the center of the triangle. Then close your eyes one at a time without moving the triangle — your dominant eye is the one that placed the object in the center.

Interestingly enough, many people (myself included) choose to use their right eye for their viewfinder even though the left one is dominant — likely because it’s the way they started shooting from the beginning.

(via Reddit)

Test Your Perception of Color with this Browser-based Game

Want to see how your eyes stack up against other photographers when it comes to seeing colors? Try your hand at Color, a simple browser-based color matching game that tests you in how quickly you can match colors. It starts with simple matching, but soon moves onto more difficult challenges involving multiple colors. Be sure to leave a comment here reporting on the score you get!

Color: A color matching game (via Fstoppers)

Jumping Spiders’ Eyes May Inspire New Camera Technologies

In a paper published in Science this week, Japanese researchers reported on a discovery that jumping spiders use a method for gauging distance called “image defocus”, which no other living organism is known to use. Rather than use focusing and stereoscopic vision like humans or head-wobbling motion parallax like birds, the spiders have two green-detecting layers in their eyes — one in focus and one not. By comparing the two, the spiders can determine the distance from objects. Scientists discovered that bathing spiders in pure red light “breaks” their distance measuring ability.
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Process This Negative With Your Brain

Here’s something that’ll blow your mind (sorry that it’s an ad): stare at the colored dots on this girl’s nose for 30 seconds, then quickly look at a white wall or ceiling (or anything pure white) and start blinking rapidly. Congratulations, you just processed a negative with your brain!

(via eject via Rob Sheridan)


P.S. Next time you’re in the photo lab, try doing this trick with your loupe and lightbox to save yourself some test prints.