Posts Tagged ‘explanation’

An Explanation of How Computers Handle Color

MinutePhysics just released this interesting (and somewhat math-y) explanation of how cameras and computers deal with the concept of color. The video is titled “Computer Color is Broken.”
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A Closer Look at Nikon’s New Phase Fresnel (PF) Lens Technology

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Weighing just 1.66 pounds, Nikon’s newly announced 300mm f/4 is the world’s lightest 300mm full frame prime autofocus lens. It’s also the first Nikon DSLR lens to feature the company’s new Phase Fresnel (PF) technology, which is the main reason the lens can be so small and lightweight.
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A Simple Explanation of the Optics Behind Pinholes, Camera Apertures, and Your Eye

If you’ve never thought to find out why aperture works the way it does, you should definitely check out this simple explanation of optics, aperture and pinholes by MinutePhysics. Read more…

Comprehensive Guide Tells You Everything You Need to Know About Codecs

If you’re thinking about adding a video component to your portfolio, one of the most important-but-confusing things you’ll have to wrap your head around is codecs — the different video compression/decompression formats available to you. These not only determine the quality retained by the camera, but also affect how you will approach the post-processing of the footage.

Unfortunately, video codecs — with all of the myriad factors at play and the number of options available — can be a bit confusing, and so cinematographer David Kong has shared the above, incredibly comprehensive look at everything you need to know. Read more…

RAW vs JPEG: Using Real-World Examples to Illustrate the Difference

It’s not news that RAW files have a far greater latitude than the same JPEG photographs. However, many beginners only understand this difference on a theoretical level.

In the video above, photography educator Tony Northrup goes beyond theory, detailing the differences and actually showing us how much more leniency RAW files allow for in post-production. Read more…

Video Tutorial: How to Make the Most of a Polarizing Filter

Polarizing filters are a piece of gear that some photographers swear by and others don’t touch. One reason why might be the various misconceptions and misunderstandings surrounding what polarizing filters do and what benefit they truly provide.

Thankfully, photographer Steve Perry is here to clear up any misconceptions. In the video above, he details what exactly polarizing filters do, why they’re beneficial for far more than just ‘making the sky blue,’ and then shares a few tips for making the most of the polarizing filter in your gear bag. Read more…

MTF Charts: The English Translation

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This post contains absolutely no mathematics. Explaining MTF without math is sort of like doing a high-wire act without a net. It’s dangerous, but for any number of reasons is more likely to keep the audience interested.
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Why the Camera Industry Clings Onto the Design of Early SLR Bodies

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Have you ever wondered why the professional photography industry is dominated by cameras that carry on the design tradition that was started by classic film SLRs?
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Fujifilm’s Moiré-Killing X-Trans Sensor is a Throwback to the Days of Film

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Fujifilm’s new X-Trans sensors diverge from the traditional way CMOS sensors are designed by using an irregular pattern of red, green, and blue pixels. This allows the sensors to eschew the standard anti-aliasing filter, eliminating moiré patterns without putting an extra component in front of the sensor. Roy Furchgott over at The New York Times has an interesting piece on how the new tech is inspired by Fujifilm’s glory days in the film photography industry:

Old fashioned analog photographs didn’t get a moire pattern because the crystals in film and photo paper aren’t even in size and placement. That randomness breaks up the moire effect.

So Fuji built a new sensor employing what it knew from the film business. Instead of using the Bayer array, it created a pattern called the X-Trans sensor which lays out the red green and blue photo sensors in a way that simulates the randomness of analog film.

Furchgott does a good job of explaining the new sensor design (and its benefits) in an easy-to-understand way.

Old Technology Modernizes a Camera Sensor [NYTimes]

Dissecting an $18 Digital Camera to Show How They Work

Here’s a dissection video for those of you who like photography better than biology. It’s a Khan Academy lesson that offers a glimpse into how digital cameras work on the inside. The camera being dissected is a Vivitar V25, a 2.1 megapixel camera that you can pick up for around $18 from places like Walmart. Although it’s basically the digital equivalent of a disposable camera, the camera still shares some things in common with higher-end digital cameras. You might be able to learn an interesting thing or two about how your own camera works.
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