Posts Tagged ‘experiments’

TEDx: Photographer Fabian Oefner Talks About Combining Art and Science

Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner recently gave this short 10-minute talk at TEDx Warwick 2013 in which he shares about how he tries to use photography to explore the two worlds of visual art and scientific principles. Many of his personal projects revolve around making natural phenomena visible, showing them in “previously unseen and poetic ways,” and “encouraging viewers to pause for a moment and appreciate the magic that constantly surrounds us.”

We’ve featured his work a handful of times before — projects that involve using fiber glass lamps to create the appearance of space nebulae, using a drill to photograph paint being flung outward, capturing soap bubbles as they pop, and shooting high-speed photos of paint-covered balloons popping.

Toy Camera Photographs Developed with Everything From Juice to Medicine

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Ever wonder what resulting photos would look like if you developed film with various liquids found around the house? Photographer Matthew Cetta does too, and he’s actually spent quite some time finding out. Cetta has been doing experiments through a project called “Photogenic Alchemy,” creating toy camera photos with wild aesthetics by developing the films with all kinds of random things — everything from lemon juice to Pepto Bismol.
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The Glory of Twixtor: Unorthodox Uses of Faux Slow-Mo

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Have you ever wanted to make the video you shot on your DSLR look like it’s playing at 1000fps, or make people warp in and out of your time lapse, on perhaps contort faces like putty? Then come explore the glory that is Twixtor. If you’re not already familiar with the software plug-in created by RE:Vision Effects then I highly suggest you check out the information below, study up, and dive in.

If you don’t already know, essentially Twixtor allows you to take your footage and slow it down to upwards of 1000fps by estimating what the frames needed in between would look like and filling in the gaps. Now it does have its limitations. Your footage has to be at least 60fps for the end result to be worthwhile, and if there’s too much movement you’ll start to get this warping effect around the movement (although used purposefully even the warping can be a fun tool).
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Nikon D600 Speck Issue May Be Limited to First Few Thousand Shots

Photographer Kyle Clementstime-lapse showing specks accumulating on the Nikon D600 over the first 1000 shots has been seen by nearly 200,000 people around the web in less than a week. Through the exposure his experiment has gotten, Clements received a good deal of feedback and suggestions regarding further experiments and what the specks might be. He has since done two new time-lapse experiments that sheds a little more light on the issue.
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How Dust and Damage on Lenses Affect Image Quality

This photograph was taken by a lens with some “obstruction” on the front element. Aside from the blurry patch of nastiness in the bottom portion of the frame, the rest of the image looks pretty decent. What do you think the “obstruction” is? A little dirt? A smudge where the photographer accidentally touched the front element? A scratch? The answer is a little closer to a scratch than a smudge…
Click here to see the answer

Experimenting with Stacks of UV Filters

One of the benefits of running a gear rental business is that you have a ton of equipment you can use for random experiments. That’s exactly what Roger Cicala, the owner of LensRentals, did with the UV filters he had on hand. One-upping the 19 filter stack we shared a while back, he mounted 50 different UV filters to a Canon 5D Mark II and 300 f/4 lens to see what the resulting images would look like.
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Bullet Time Lightning with a Tesla Coil and 10 Canon A470 Cameras

Hacker Rob Flickenger wasn’t satisfied with ordinary photographs of his ongoing Tesla coil experiments, so he decided to shoot Matrix-style “bullet time” images to capture “3D lightning”. He purchased 10 Canon A470 cameras and configured them to function as a single 70-megapixel 10-angle camera.

Why that particular camera? Partly because I found someone dumping a bunch of them on eBay for cheap, but also because they run CHDK, the infamous scriptable firmware for Canon cameras. This let me write some code to streamline the process of taking ten photos all at once, and then get them off of the cameras in a reasonable manner. By wiring all of them to the same 10-port USB hub, and using CHDK’s syncable USB remote feature, I was able to wire up a single button to make all of the cameras fire at once.

His hard work paid off, and Flickenger managed to capture some pretty unique shots of his Tesla coil in action.

Bullet time lightning [HackerFriendly.com]

How to Turn Your Room into a Giant Camera Obscura

National Geographic created this nifty little video teaching how to turn any room with a view into a giant camera obscura. For an even more challenging project, you can try setting up some photo-sensitive paper (either photo paper or paper you paint with emulsion yourself) on the wall to shoot giant photos with your giant camera obscura.

(via Foto Actualidad)

Random Experiments at 2,564 Frames per Second with a Phantom Flex

Tom Guilmette was doing a project in Vegas that involved a Phantom Flex high speed camera when he decided to experiment with 2,564 frames per second in his hotel room. This is the resulting video showing his random experiments.

Even ugly things in life (like dropping your phone) are beautiful in super slow motion.

(via Engadget)

Floating Light Words with Custom Bokeh

Kaleb Wentzel-Fisher had the brilliant idea of using custom bokeh to spell out words in his videos, and spent a good amount of time developing and perfecting the idea. The above video, titled “Light Works”, is a demonstration of this technique in action. The results are pretty awesome.
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