Posts Tagged ‘experimentation’

The Glory of Twixtor: Unorthodox Uses of Faux Slow-Mo

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Have you ever wanted to make the video you shot on your DSLR look like it’s playing at 1000fps, or make people warp in and out of your time lapse, on perhaps contort faces like putty? Then come explore the glory that is Twixtor. If you’re not already familiar with the software plug-in created by RE:Vision Effects then I highly suggest you check out the information below, study up, and dive in.

If you don’t already know, essentially Twixtor allows you to take your footage and slow it down to upwards of 1000fps by estimating what the frames needed in between would look like and filling in the gaps. Now it does have its limitations. Your footage has to be at least 60fps for the end result to be worthwhile, and if there’s too much movement you’ll start to get this warping effect around the movement (although used purposefully even the warping can be a fun tool).
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5 Unique Ways to Use Your GoPro

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The advent of the GoPro has brought about a real surge in adventure and sports photography/videos. Suddenly amateurs have been able to capture some of their pro-level tricks and treks and share them with their friends and the Internet.

While some people tend to look down on amateur-level photography, I think most would agree that at least this avenue has actually made things far more exciting. What has made this instance so different? Well, while some are satisfied simply strapping their GoPro to their head and jumping on a mountain bike (exciting in and of itself) others have found some more inventive ways of utilizing their camera.
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Use a Drop of Water as a Macro Lens for Phone Photographs

Here’s a super cool trick: instead of buying a special macro lens for your smart phone, simply use a drop of water! Carefully place a drop of water over your lens, carefully invert the phone, and voila — instant macro shots with the cheapest lens you’ll ever own. Alex Wild over at Scientific American has more details on the technique and some great sample shots taken with it.

Transform Your iPhone Into a Microscope: Just Add Water (via Gizmodo)

Trippy Footage from a Digital Camera Mounted to an Electric Drill

Just in case you’ve always been wondering what it would look like to record footage with a camera attached to a spinning electric drill, French product designer Oscar Lhermitte did just that. The resulting footage is quite trippy, and would be a pretty unique way of capturing abstract photographs — as long as you don’t mind the risk of disintegrating your camera.

(via Gizmodo)

How to Shoot Sound Painting Photos with Paint and a Speaker

Last week we featured some “sound painting” photographs by Martin Klimas, captured by using a speaker to vibrate paint. Here’s a video tutorial by some Arizona State University Polytechnic students demonstrating how you can do your own “sound painting” photos. They use a thrift store speaker covered with a garbage bag and some Crayola poster paint.

(via ISO 1200)

How to Fold an Origami Pinhole Camera Out of Photographic Paper

Here’s a neat idea for photographic experimentation: create a pinhole camera out of photographic paper by folding it into an origami box with the light-sensitive side on the inside. The hole that is used to blow the box into its shape is also used to expose the inside to the outside world. After exposing it, simply unfold it and process it using standard developer and fix.

(via DIYP)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Floating Light Words with Custom Bokeh

Kaleb Wentzel-Fisher had the brilliant idea of using custom bokeh to spell out words in his videos, and spent a good amount of time developing and perfecting the idea. The above video, titled “Light Works”, is a demonstration of this technique in action. The results are pretty awesome.
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Using a Leica Noctilux on a Sony NEX

Darren Chan recently attached his $6,500 Leica Noctilux 50mm f/1 lens to his Sony NEX-5 camera using an adapter in order to test out the unique combo. As you might expect, the combo is great for creamy bokeh and doing nighttime street photography in areas with low light.
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