Posts Tagged ‘experimental’

Macro Shots Using a Canon 5D Mark II with a 4×5 Large Format Camera

London-based photographer David Wilman recently did some experiments in which he used a Canon 5D Mark II as a digital back for his MPP 4×5 large format camera. He placed his lens-less 5D at the back of the camera at the film plane and then placed a black cloth over the two cameras to prevent any light from spilling onto the sensor. Light from the Schneider Kreuznach Xenar 4.5/150mm lens entered straight into the open mirror box of the DSLR without any physical link between the two cameras. Wilman was surprised to discovered that this pairing produced quite a respectable macro setup.
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Distress Your Film by Putting It Through a Dishwasher Cycle

There’s a subgroup of film photographers who are dedicated to coming up with inventive new ways to distress film in order to achieve unexpected — and occasionally beautiful — results. Last year we shared that soaking film in rubbing alcohol does strange things to your images. Here’s another crazy idea: put a roll of film through the dishwasher. Photographer Tom Welland did just that and ended up with some vintage-looking photos.
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How to Shoot Sound Painting Photos with Paint and a Speaker

Last week we featured some “sound painting” photographs by Martin Klimas, captured by using a speaker to vibrate paint. Here’s a video tutorial by some Arizona State University Polytechnic students demonstrating how you can do your own “sound painting” photos. They use a thrift store speaker covered with a garbage bag and some Crayola poster paint.

(via ISO 1200)

The Results of Printing 35mm Film onto Skin Using the Sun

Last week we published a post asking whether anyone had made a “print” on their skin by placing a negative on their skin under the sun. After seeing the post, videographer Jeremiah Warren decided to conduct the experiment for the benefit of all mankind. Taping four slides onto his forearm (he didn’t have any suitable negative film), Warren exposed his skin for four hours in 100-degree heat (consuming a gallon of water in the process).

Check out the video above for his results — the “prints” didn’t turn out as awesome as he had hoped. Using negative film might produce better results since slide film prints a negative image onto skin, but it doesn’t seem like sunlight is focused enough to print a sharp image onto skin.

Printing Negatives onto Skin with the Sun

Here’s really random/strange/stupid idea inspired by a comment left yesterday, but have you heard of anyone “printing” a photograph onto their skin using a negative under sunlight? Seems like it would produce a correct positive image of a negative.

Next time you go to the beach, try sticking a negative onto your body and see what shows up at the end of the day!

Throwing Around a Camera on a Stick

With HD video cameras getting smaller and smaller, people are constantly attaching them to random things to give us bizarre perspectives that weren’t very easy to capture before, whether it’s the end of a broadsword or the tip of an arrow. In the video above, some friends decided to attach a GoPro camera to the end of a stick and throw it back and forth while running around. At 6 minutes, it runs a bit long, but who knew the simple idea could create such awesome results?


Update: Also check out this one with a GoPro attached to a hula hoop.

Chromogenic Prints Modified with Bleach

These bizarre looking images are what you get when you “modify” chromogenic prints with chlorine bleach. Flickr user Sarah Palmer has done a number of experiments with these technique, and the results are pretty abstract.
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Camera Toss Photos with Peace of Mind

Camera toss photography involves having your camera shoot photographs while it’s being tossed wildly into the air. The problem is, you’ll usually want to play around with this kind of photography at night, when long exposure times will create pretty abstract images. If catching your camera on its way down in the dark isn’t something that sits well with you, you might want do try what Flickr user Robert Couse did — protect your camera using an inflatable swim tube, a piece of cardboard, and some gaffers tape.

(via DIYPhotography.net)


Image credits: Photographs by Robert Couse-Baker

Pinhole Cameras Made with Photo Paper

Photographer Thomas Hudson Reeve shoots pinhole photographs in a pretty interesting way — rather than using photo-sensitive paper or film inside a separate camera, he creates the camera using photo paper itself. The resulting photograph is exposed onto the inside of the photo-sensitive camera (which he calls the “PaperCam”), and creates a pretty surreal look when opened up and developed.
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How to Turn Your DSLR into a Simple Pinhole Camera

Make just published this short but informative tutorial on how to turn your DSLR into a pinhole camera by punching a hole in a body cap. If you have a spare body cap lying around (how often do you use those things anyway?) this can be a fun way to experiment with your camera.